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Cambridge Law Interviews: Louis
 
03:29
First Year Law Student Louis describes his experience of attending an interview to study the Cambridge BA Law Degree.
Views: 23511 Cambridge Law Faculty
Law Subject Extension: Law of Tort: Part 1
 
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Tort law is a collection of legal rules and ideas which protect you from harm and vindicates many of your rights but you probably haven't hear of it that much unless you've already looked at legal questions. The most famous tort is negligence, one you might have heard of. In this module you'll look at a case within the tort of negligence called Nettleship v Weston from 1971 (http://www.bailii.org/ew/cases/EWCA/C...). The key question in the case was how much care the driver of a care should take when driving on the road. From such a simple question you'll be able to engage with incredibly difficult issues such as what it means to be at fault, what risks we actually accept compared to what risks we do accept in life and who ultimately should pay for harm done in society. You can also read one of the judgments of one of the twentieth century's most famous and most fascinating judges! There are three videos in this series: - Part 1: https://youtu.be/mjoQAXVQ2oQ - Part 2: https://youtu.be/h9-B-jTgPio - Part 3: https://youtu.be/3vBnR8SbnzE There are three worksheets with questions for you to consider, which can be done alongside the videos and the case. There are also three further documents, containing more depth and detail on the videos themselves, in case you find text more useful than videos: - Worksheet 1: http://resources.law.cam.ac.uk/documents/heplus/tort_law_subject_extension_worksheet_1.pdf - Further exploration 1: http://resources.law.cam.ac.uk/documents/heplus/tort_law_subject_extension_further_study_1.pdf
Views: 18279 Cambridge Law Faculty
Graham Virgo: Why Study a Law Degree
 
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Professor Graham Virgo discusses why students should consider studying a Law degree, whether or not they have decided that they wish to pursue a career in law as a solicitor or a barrister.
Views: 24954 Cambridge Law Faculty
Law Subject Extension: Constitutional Law: Part 1
 
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Dr Mark Elliott discusses the Belmarsh Prison case (http://www.bailii.org/uk/cases/UKHL/2004/56.html) - more formally known as A v Secretary of State for the Home Department - which was decided in 2004 by the Appellate Committee of the House of Lords (the forerunner of today's United Kingdom Supreme Court). The first of these three videos sets the scene by explaining the background to and the effect of Part 4 of the Anti-terrorism, Crime and Security Act 2001 (http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/2001/24/part/4/enacted) (which has since been repealed). The legislation was enacted at speed, in the immediate aftermath of the 9/11 attacks, and provided for the indefinite detention, without charge or trial, of suspected foreign terrorists who could not lawfully be deported. Although imprisoning people in such circumstances breaches the right to liberty in Article 5 of the European Convention on Human Rights (http://www.echr.coe.int/NR/rdonlyres/D5CC24A7-DC13-4318-B457-5C9014916D7A/0/Convention_ENG.pdf), the UK Government argued that the right to liberty could, in effect, be suspended under Article 15 of the Convention, on the ground that there was a "public emergency threatening the life of the nation". There are three videos in this series: - Part 1: https://youtu.be/a_BOYxQtZLs - Part 2: https://youtu.be/H6lCiMeworc - Part 3: https://youtu.be/lQNPuXtI_i0 A document supporting this video is available at: http://resources.law.cam.ac.uk/documents/heplus/constitutional-law-subject-extension-material-1.pdf
Views: 11253 Cambridge Law Faculty
The Law of 'Joint Enterprise': Graham Virgo
 
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Professor Graham Virgo is Professor of English Private Law at the Faculty of Law, University of Cambridge, and also Deputy Chair of the Faculty Board. In this video, Professor Virgo considers the current position of the law relating to defendants who are prosecuted in cases of 'common purpose'. Several different circumstances are often combined to form the confused category of 'Joint Enterprise'. Professor Virgo outlines these different circumstances, criticises the current state of the law in this field, and seeks to provide some possible reforms to clarify the situation. In April 2014, the Bureau of Investigative Journalism published the results of the first statistical analysis of 'Joint Enterprise' homicide cases. Both Professor Virgo and Dr Matthew Dyson (also of the University of Cambridge) were consulted by the BIJ as part of the investigation (see http://www.law.cam.ac.uk/press/news/2014/04/graham-virgo-and-matthew-dyson-consulted-on-joint-enterprise-report-by-bureau-of-investigative-journalism/2602) A BBC documentary broadcast on 7 July 2014 examined this area of law and specifically the case of Alex Henry, who was found guilty of stabbing Taqui Khezihi, despite him claiming to have never touched the knife. (See http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b049bb31) The BBC also broadcast a drama based on 'joint enterprise' law on 6 July 2014 entitled 'Common'. (See http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p021gb62) Notes and structure: 1. There is no law of 'joint enterprise': no statute, no doctrine, just a tag which hides much confusion as to the state of the law. 2. Three senses of 'joint enterprise': (a) Two principal offenders with a common purpose (b) General accessorial liability (i) Procures, assists or encourages the principal to commit a crime. (ii) Intention to do the act of assisting or encouraging. (iii) Knowing, believing or foreseeing that the principal will/might commit the crime. (iv) Not liable where an unequivocal withdrawal. (c) Departure from a joint enterprise ('parasitical accessorial liability') (i) A common purpose to commit one crime (A). This purpose may be express or tacit. (ii) The principal departs from the common purpose to commit crime B. (iii) The accessory foresees that the principal might commit crime B as a possibility. (iv) Not liable where crime B is fundamentally different from that contemplated. 3. The prevalence of 'joint enterprise'. The Bureau of Investigative Journalism (April 2014) identified 1,853 people convicted of homicide between 2005-2013 where there were four or more participants. These are assumed to involve joint enterprise cases. 4. What has gone wrong with 'the law on joint enterprise'? (a) The language of 'joint enterprise'. Accessorial liability is preferable. (b) Prosecution policy. CPS Guidance on Joint Enterprise Charging Decisions (2012). (c) The state of the law: foresight suffices, but foresight of what? (d) Judicial directions of the jury and the dangers of inference. (e) Complex trials involving a significant number of defendants. (f) Sentencing, especially for murder. 5. Reform
Views: 12086 Cambridge Law Faculty
Law Subject Extension: Criminal Law: Part 1
 
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Professor Graham Virgo discusses the case of Re A (Conjoined Twins) [2000] EWCA Civ 254 (judgement at http://www.bailii.org/ew/cases/EWCA/Civ/2000/254.html). This video examines the facts of the case, how it turned on legal principles underpinning the offence of murder, and how the reasoning behind the judgments of each of the Judges (Ward, Brooke and Walker LJ) were radically different. There are three videos in this series: - Part 1: https://youtu.be/Gop9HWE9drg - Part 2: https://youtu.be/-lidNiKBfF0 - Part 3: https://youtu.be/UBVARryZAtU A document supporting this video is available at: http://resources.law.cam.ac.uk/documents/heplus/criminal-law-subject-extension-material-1.pdf
Views: 3557 Cambridge Law Faculty
Law Subject Extension: Land Law: Part 2
 
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Amy Goymour discusses the claim made by the squatters for ownership of a development site in the decision of the House of Lords in Pye v Graham (see http://www.bailii.org/uk/cases/UKHL/2002/30.html). In particular, she examines the meaning of 'possession' and 'adverse' in the legal definition of 'adverse possession'. There are four videos in this series: - Part 1: https://youtu.be/EE8480_EKBo - Part 2: https://youtu.be/-lSrQzZKVuU - Part 3: https://youtu.be/wDj4N0bnp9E - Part 4: https://youtu.be/KGHIJXi-BHU
Views: 3396 Cambridge Law Faculty
A Day in the Life of a Cambridge Law Student
 
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Three first year undergraduate Law students at the University of Cambridge record their activities on a typical day.
Views: 156300 Cambridge Law Faculty
Law Subject Extension: Constitutional Law: Part 3
 
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Dr Mark Elliott discusses the Belmarsh Prison case (http://www.bailii.org/uk/cases/UKHL/2004/56.html) - more formally known as A v Secretary of State for the Home Department - which was decided in 2004 by the Appellate Committee of the House of Lords (the forerunner of today's United Kingdom Supreme Court). This final video considers the effect of the judgment of the Appellate Committee of the House of Lords in the Belmarsh Prison case. The Law Lords concluded that the right to liberty remained effective and that the powers to detain foreign terror suspects under Part 4 of the Anti-terrorism, Crime and Security Act 2001 (http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/2001/24/part/4/enacted) breached that right. The Law Lords therefore issued a "declaration of incompatibility" under section 4 of the Human Rights Act 1998 (http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/1998/42/contents). Although that did not require Parliament to repeal (i.e. get rid of) the incompatible legislation, Parliament did in fact repeal it. It did so partly because the House of Lords' judgment had placed Parliament under political pressure to bring UK law into line with the rights recognized in the ECHR, and partly because there was the possibility of litigation in the European Court of Human Rights that might ultimately have compelled the UK, under international law, to amend British law. This highlights the fact that that understanding UK public law involves grappling with the relationships between national and international law, and between law and politics. There are three videos in this series: - Part 1: https://youtu.be/a_BOYxQtZLs - Part 2: https://youtu.be/H6lCiMeworc - Part 3: https://youtu.be/lQNPuXtI_i0 A document supporting this video is available at: http://resources.law.cam.ac.uk/documents/heplus/constitutional-law-subject-extension-material-3.pdf
Views: 5983 Cambridge Law Faculty
Law Subject Extension: Land Law: Part 1
 
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Amy Goymour discusses some of the explores some of the reasons why the law might permit 'squatters' to acquire rights over someone else's land. There are four videos in this series: - Part 1: https://youtu.be/EE8480_EKBo - Part 2: https://youtu.be/-lSrQzZKVuU - Part 3: https://youtu.be/wDj4N0bnp9E - Part 4: https://youtu.be/KGHIJXi-BHU
Views: 3877 Cambridge Law Faculty
Example Cambridge Law Admissions Interview
 
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This video shows a mock admissions interview for the Cambridge BA Tripos Degree in Law, conducted at Trinity College, Cambridge in November 2017. This video is intended to give potential applicants an idea of what an interview might be like. The video is a typical, representative example of a Cambridge Law admissions interview – but please do not think of it as a model, perfect or ideal interview: exactly what a Law admissions interview looks like varies from college to college and from interviewer to interviewer. In this interview, two interviewers spend 20-25 minutes speaking with the candidate, Rhianna, who is a Cambridge undergraduate but not a Law student. Rhianna was given a page containing a short set of facts, together with information about the relevant law, 30 minutes before the interview. You can download the information which the candidate was given at: https://resources.law.cam.ac.uk/documents/Law_Factual_Scenario_Example.pdf Most Cambridge Law admissions interviews include an exercise related to law or related to more general moral or practical reasoning but, again, practice varies from college to college and interviewer to interviewer. Although the exercises often raise legal issues, or even involve the use of legal tests, candidates are not generally expected to have, and are not being tested on, any legal knowledge: if any law is required to complete the exercise, it will be provided. Even where candidates have indicated (on their application forms) that they have already studied some law – such as at A Level – we only expect them to know as much of the law as they have studied. Note that candidates coming to Cambridge for interview will also be required to sit the Cambridge Law Test (CLT); you can read more about the CLT and view some example papers at: http://ba.law.cam.ac.uk/applying/cambridge_law_test/
Views: 153899 Cambridge Law Faculty
Law students reflect on their interviews
 
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This video features three undergraduate Law students studying at the Faculty of Law, University of Cambridge. The students: Louise, Jarvis and Alekhya, reflect on their experiences of being interviewed for admission to Cambridge. This video is intended to give potential applicants an idea of what an interview might be like, and to give students who have experienced the interview an opportunity to offer their advice. If you wish to ask current students any questions about studying at Cambridge, or the admissions process, you can do so by emailing askastudent@law.cam.ac.uk To find out more about the Cambridge Law Degree, or applying to study at Cambridge, see: Website: http://www.law.cam.ac.uk Twitter: http://twitter.com/cambridgelaw Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/cambridgelawfaculty
Views: 9505 Cambridge Law Faculty
Law Subject Extension: Criminal Law: Part 2
 
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Professor Graham Virgo discusses whether the decision in Re A (Conjoined Twins) [2000] EWCA Civ 254 (judgement at http://www.bailii.org/ew/cases/EWCA/Civ/2000/254.html) has other implications for the criminal law, and whether it can be applied in other contexts. Does Re A introduce the possibility of a necessity defence in cases of murder? There are three videos in this series: - Part 1: https://youtu.be/Gop9HWE9drg - Part 2: https://youtu.be/-lidNiKBfF0 - Part 3: https://youtu.be/UBVARryZAtU A document supporting this video is available at: http://resources.law.cam.ac.uk/documents/heplus/criminal-law-subject-extension-material-2.pdf
Views: 1831 Cambridge Law Faculty
Law Subject Extension: Land Law: Part 4
 
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Amy Goymour discusses the changes made to the law of adverse possession in 2003 by the Land Registration Act 2002, which now make it more difficult for a squatter to acquire ownership of another person’s land. There are four videos in this series: - Part 1: https://youtu.be/EE8480_EKBo - Part 2: https://youtu.be/-lSrQzZKVuU - Part 3: https://youtu.be/wDj4N0bnp9E - Part 4: https://youtu.be/KGHIJXi-BHU
Views: 2187 Cambridge Law Faculty
The Politics of International Law: Martti Koskenniemi
 
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The Lauterpacht Centre for International Law (LCIL), University of Cambridge hosts a regular Friday lunchtime lecture series on key areas of International Law. Previous subjects have included UN peacekeeping operations, the advisory jurisdiction of the International Court of Justice, the crime of agression, whaling, children and military tribunals, and theories and practices for proving individual responsibility criminal responsibility for genocide and crimes against humanity. This lecture, entitled 'The Politics of International Law', was delivered at the Lauterpacht Centre on Thursday 26th January 2012 by Professor Martti Koskenniemi, Professor of International Law and Director of the Erik Castrén Institute, University of Helsinki. For more information about the series, please see the LCIL website at www.lcil.cam.ac.uk Professor Koskenniemi is introduced by Professor James Crawford of the University of Cambridge and Lauterpacht Centre for International Law.
Views: 32571 Cambridge Law Faculty
Professor Philip Allott: The Idealist's Dilemma: Re-imagining International Society
 
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On 23 May 2014, Professor Allott addressed the Spring Conference of the International Law Association British Branch at the Inner Temple, London. Professor Allott's speech was entitled 'The Idealist's Dilemma: Re-imagining International Society'. This lecture was subsequently recorded on video at the Faculty of Law. Other lectures and resources featuring Professor Allott are collected in the Squire Law Library Eminent Scholars Archive (ESA) at http://www.squire.law.cam.ac.uk/eminent_scholars/professor_pj_allott.php
Views: 1542 Cambridge Law Faculty
Law Subject Extension: Land Law: Part 3
 
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Amy Goymour discusses how the legal definition of 'adverse possession' might be applied in some hypothetical factual scenarios concerning squatters' claims to land. There are four videos in this series: - Part 1: https://youtu.be/EE8480_EKBo - Part 2: https://youtu.be/-lSrQzZKVuU - Part 3: https://youtu.be/wDj4N0bnp9E - Part 4: https://youtu.be/KGHIJXi-BHU
Views: 1829 Cambridge Law Faculty
'Those Who Wish to Practise Law Should Not Study Law at University'?
 
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On 27 February 2013 the Faculty of Law hosted an important and lively debate between Lord Sumption and Professor Graham Virgo on the motion 'Those who wish to Practise Law should not Study Law at University'. Sir Patrick Elias, Lord Justice of Appeal, who chaired the debate, kept order in a packed auditorium. For more information, see http://www.law.cam.ac.uk/press/news/2013/03/those-who-wish-to-practise-law-should-not-study-law-at-university/2190
Views: 83557 Cambridge Law Faculty
Admissions to Cambridge Law: Mr Henry Mares 2017
 
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The Faculty of Law holds an annual Open Day for undergraduate students, at which members of the Faculty discuss the Faculty, the Cambridge admissions system, and the benefits studying Law at Cambridge, The Open Day gives potential students, and their parents and teachers, a chance to look around the Faculty and the Squire Law Library, meet members of Faculty staff, and ask any questions they might have. In this lecture on 5 July 2017, Mr Henry Mares discusses the admission procedure for students wishing to apply to the University of Cambridge. The general talks given at this Open Day are available to watch or listen to via the University Streaming Media Service, iTunes U or YouTube. For more information about the Undergraduate BA Law Tripos Degree please refer to http://ba.law.cam.ac.uk
Views: 4621 Cambridge Law Faculty
The Dissertation (Seminar) Option: Abi
 
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Abi talks about the her experiences of studying a seminar subject and writing a dissertation as part of her undergraduate Law degree at Cambridge.
Views: 1232 Cambridge Law Faculty
'Public Policy, Illegality and Contracts': 2015 Allen & Overy Lecture
 
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On Tuesday 24 November 2015, Lord (Tony) Grabiner QC delivered the 2015 Cambridge Private Law Centre Allen & Overy Annual Law Lecture entitled "Public Policy, Illegality and Contracts". The event was kindly sponsored by Allen & Overy. More information about this lecture is available from the Private Law Centre website at www.privatelaw.law.cam.ac.uk/events/past-events
Views: 33407 Cambridge Law Faculty
Law at Cambridge: Dr Claire Fenton-Glynn 2017
 
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The Faculty of Law holds an annual Open Day for undergraduate students, at which members of the Faculty discuss the Faculty, the Cambridge admissions system, and the benefits studying Law at Cambridge, The Open Day gives potential students, and their parents and teachers, a chance to look around the Faculty and the Squire Law Library, meet members of Faculty staff, and ask any questions they might have. In this lecture on 5 July 2017 Dr Claire Fenton-Glynn outlines the nature of the Cambridge Law BA Tripos Degree. The general talks given at this Open Day are available to watch or listen to via the University Streaming Media Service, iTunes U or YouTube. For more information about the Undergraduate BA Law Tripos Degree please refer to http://ba.law.cam.ac.uk
Views: 6234 Cambridge Law Faculty
EU Referendum questions: Intellectual Property
 
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In this ongoing series of short videos, academics from the University of Cambridge and beyond shed light on the key issues to be considered in the run up to the upcoming referendum on the UK's membership of the European Union. This video features Dr Jennifer Davis, member of the Centre for Intellectual Property and Information Law (CIPIL), considering the progress made by the EU in the field of intellectual property law, and what the impact of a withdrawal might mean for the protection of rights in the UK. This series of videos has been created by the Centre for European Legal Studies (CELS). For more information visit http://www.cels.law.cam.ac.uk/
Stelios Tofaris: Tort Law
 
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Dr Stelios Tofaris discusses the study of the Law of Tort at the Faculty of Law, University of Cambridge.
Views: 2807 Cambridge Law Faculty
Welcome to the Faculty of Law: Professor Richard Fentiman 2017
 
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The Faculty of Law holds an annual Open Day for undergraduate students, at which members of the Faculty discuss the Faculty, the Cambridge admissions system, and the benefits studying Law at Cambridge, The Open Day gives potential students, and their parents and teachers, a chance to look around the Faculty and the Squire Law Library, meet members of Faculty staff, and ask any questions they might have. In this lecture on 5 July 2017 the Chair of the Faculty Professor Richard Fentiman welcomes attendees to the Faculty Open Day. The general talks given at this Open Day are available to watch or listen to via the University Streaming Media Service, iTunes U or YouTube. For more information about the Undergraduate BA Law Tripos Degree please refer to http://ba.law.cam.ac.uk
Views: 1657 Cambridge Law Faculty
'The British and Europe': 2014 Cambridge Freshfields Lecture
 
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On Wednesday 12 February 2014 Lord Neuberger, President of the Supreme Court of the United Kingdom, delivered the inaugural 2014 Cambridge Freshfields Lecture entitled "The British and Europe". The Cambridge Freshfields Lecture is an annual address delivered by a guest of the Cambridge Private Law Centre, and the event is sponsored by Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer. More information about this lecture, including photographs from the event, is available from the Private Law Centre website at http://www.privatelaw.law.cam.ac.uk/events/past-events
Views: 8788 Cambridge Law Faculty
David Feldman: Constitutional Law
 
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Professor David Feldman discusses the study of Constitutional Law at the Faculty of Law, University of Cambridge.
Views: 2126 Cambridge Law Faculty
Law Lectures and Supervisions: Tom
 
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Tom talks about the differences between lectures and supervisions, and the way they work together to deliver the undergraduate Law degree at Cambridge.
Views: 1249 Cambridge Law Faculty
Turbo Talks: Repeal, convert, correct: the UK and the Great Repeal Bill
 
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In this video, Professor Catherine Barnard explains the aims and the objectives of the 'Great Repeal Bill' and how it might function. Article 218 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union sets out the EU’s rules for conducting negotiations with third parties. It applies to negotiations between the EU and one or more non-member states or international organisations. In these Turbo Talks, leading academic commentators from the University of Cambridge highlight the issues facing the UK as it seeks to negotiate a Brexit agreement in the wake of the 'leave' result of the referendum on EU membership. With reference to the article, these videos seek to explain key issues within 218 seconds. For more information about the academics, please see the Faculty of Law at the University of Cambridge (https://www.law.cam.ac.uk) or the Centre for European Legal Studies (CELS) (https://www.cels.law.cam.ac.uk).
'An Insider's Guide to Practising Corporate Law Across the Pond' - Geoffrey Shields: 3CL Lecture
 
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Professor Geoffrey Shields, Dean of Vermont Law School from 2004 to mid-2012 and a Herbert Smith visitor to the Law Faculty, gave a Centre for Corporate and Commercial Law (3CL) lunchtime talk on Friday 19 October 2012 on the practice of corporate law in US law firms, with particular reference to the hiring of overseas lawyers. He also discussed how those with corporate-related Masters' credentials might secure entry into investment banking, venture capital, government positions and teaching jobs. Professor Shields is uniquely well positioned to provide law students with an "insider's" guide to opportunities in the US because before becoming Dean at Vermont he was a partner and chair of the Management Committee of Gardner Carton and Douglas, a major law firm based in Chicago and Washington DC. When in pratice Professor Shields specialized in legal issues relating to not-for-profit institutions, mergers and acquisitions, restructuring, finance, joint ventures, and related tax and securities matters. For more information see the Centre for Corporate and Commercial Law website at http://www.3cl.law.cam.ac.uk/
Views: 10816 Cambridge Law Faculty
EU Referendum questions: Free movement of workers
 
04:04
In this ongoing series of short videos, academics from the University of Cambridge and beyond shed light on the key issues to be considered in the run up to the upcoming referendum on the UK's membership of the European Union. This video features Professor Catherine Barnard, Professor of European Union Law, considering what the impact of Britain's membership of the EU has been on the ability of workers to seek work in other countries, and for workers to seek work in the UK. She further discusses what each outcome of the vote might mean for employees in the UK. This series of videos has been created by the Centre for European Legal Studies (CELS). For more information visit http://www.cels.law.cam.ac.uk/
Law Subject Extension: Law of Tort: Part 2
 
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Tort law is a collection of legal rules and ideas which protect you from harm and vindicates many of your rights but you probably haven't hear of it that much unless you've already looked at legal questions. The most famous tort is negligence, one you might have heard of. In this module you'll look at a case within the tort of negligence called Nettleship v Weston from 1971 (http://www.bailii.org/ew/cases/EWCA/C...). The key question in the case was how much care the driver of a care should take when driving on the road. From such a simple question you'll be able to engage with incredibly difficult issues such as what it means to be at fault, what risks we actually accept compared to what risks we do accept in life and who ultimately should pay for harm done in society. You can also read one of the judgments of one of the twentieth century's most famous and most fascinating judges! There are three videos in this series: - Part 1: https://youtu.be/mjoQAXVQ2oQ - Part 2: https://youtu.be/h9-B-jTgPio - Part 3: https://youtu.be/3vBnR8SbnzE There are three worksheets with questions for you to consider, which can be done alongside the videos and the case. There are also three further documents, containing more depth and detail on the videos themselves, in case you find text more useful than videos: - Worksheet 2: http://resources.law.cam.ac.uk/documents/heplus/tort_law_subject_extension_worksheet_2.pdf - Further exploration 2: http://resources.law.cam.ac.uk/documents/heplus/tort_law_subject_extension_further_study_2.pdf
Views: 6303 Cambridge Law Faculty
'Not in the Public Interest': The 2014 Sir David Williams Lecture - Conor Gearty
 
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On Friday 21 February 2014, Conor Gearty of LSE and Matrix Chambers, delivered the 2014 Sir David Williams Lecture entitled "Not in the Public Interest". The Sir David Williams Lecture is an annual address delivered by a guest lecturer in honour of Sir David Williams, Emeritus Rouse Ball Professor of English Law and Emeritus Vice-Chancellor of Cambridge University. More information about this lecture, including photographs from the event, is available from the Centre for Public Law website at http://www.cpl.law.cam.ac.uk/sir_david_williams_lectures/
Views: 2850 Cambridge Law Faculty
'What Have Ships Ever Done for You? The Impact of Maritime Law': 2016 Allen & Overy Lecture
 
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On Wednesday 16 November 2016, The Honourable Chief Justice Geoffrey Ma GBM QC SC delivered the 2016 Cambridge Private Law Centre Allen & Overy Annual Law Lecture entitled "What Have Ships Ever Done for You? The Impact of Maritime Law". The event was kindly sponsored by Allen & Overy. More information about this lecture is available from the Private Law Centre website at www.privatelaw.law.cam.ac.uk/events/past-events
Views: 3067 Cambridge Law Faculty
'Did Derivatives Cause the Financial Crisis?' - Ed Murray: 3CL Lecture
 
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As part of the Faculty's 3CL/Private Law Seminars, and sponsored by 3CL, Ed Murray, a partner at Allen & Overy, gave an evening lecture entitled "Did derivatives cause the financial crisis? A practising lawyer's perspective" on Monday, 13 February 2012. Ed Murray is a senior member of the Allen & Overy team advising ISDA (International Swaps and Derivatives Association) as its principal global external counsel, and is Chairman of ISDA's Financial Law Reform Committee, which co-ordinates ISDA's lobbying efforts with international organisations, European institutions and national authorities on financial law reform matters. For more information see the Centre for Corporate and Commercial Law website at http://www.3cl.law.cam.ac.uk/
Views: 5260 Cambridge Law Faculty
Law Subject Extension: Criminal Law: Part 3
 
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Professor Graham Virgo discusses considering whether a proposed legal principle is satisfactory by applying it to other hypothetical scenarios. He applies the application of murder, and possible defences (including Re A as previously discussed), to three sets of circumstances: - The Herald of Free Enterprise Disaster; - Interconnected rock climbers; and - R v Dudley and Stephens (1884) 14 QBD 273 DC (full report at http://www.justis.com/titles/iclr_bqb14040.html). There are three videos in this series: - Part 1: https://youtu.be/Gop9HWE9drg - Part 2: https://youtu.be/-lidNiKBfF0 - Part 3: https://youtu.be/UBVARryZAtU A document supporting this video is available at: http://resources.law.cam.ac.uk/documents/heplus/criminal-law-subject-extension-material-3.pdf
Views: 1730 Cambridge Law Faculty
'The Rule of Law and Human Dignity': The 2011 Sir David Williams Lecture - Professor Jeremy Waldron
 
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The Sir David Williams Lecture is an annual address delivered by a guest lecturer in honour of Sir David Williams, Emeritus Rouse Ball Professor of English Law and Emeritus Vice-Chancellor of Cambridge University. On Friday 6 May 2011, Professor Jeremy Waldron delivered the 2011 Sir David Williams Lecture entitled "The Rule of Law and Human Dignity". More information about this lecture, including photographs from the event, is available from the Centre for Public Law website at www.cpl.law.cam.ac.uk/sir_david_williams_lectures/
Views: 10068 Cambridge Law Faculty
EU Referendum questions: Migrant benefits
 
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In this ongoing series of short videos, academics from the University of Cambridge and beyond shed light on the key issues to be considered in the run up to the upcoming referendum on the UK's membership of the European Union. This video features Professor Catherine Barnard, Professor of European Union Law, sharing her experiences of researching the reasons why EU migrants move to the UK, and the extent to which the benefits available factor into that decision. She then considers the effects of the concessions won by David Cameron should the UK vote to remain on 23rd June. This series of videos has been created by the Centre for European Legal Studies (CELS). For more information visit http://www.cels.law.cam.ac.uk/
Law Subject Extension: Constitutional Law: Part 2
 
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Dr Mark Elliott discusses the Belmarsh Prison case (http://www.bailii.org/uk/cases/UKHL/2004/56.html) - more formally known as A v Secretary of State for the Home Department - which was decided in 2004 by the Appellate Committee of the House of Lords (the forerunner of today's United Kingdom Supreme Court). In this second video, the judgment of the Appellate Committee of the House of Lords in the Belmarsh Prison case is considered. The issue for the House of Lords was whether Article 15 of the European Convention on Human Rights (http://www.echr.coe.int/NR/rdonlyres/D5CC24A7-DC13-4318-B457-5C9014916D7A/0/Convention_ENG.pdf) could be invoked so as to (in effect) suspend the right to liberty normally granted by Article 5 of the Convention, thereby avoiding any clash between that right and the Government's powers under Part 4 of the Anti-terrorism, Crime and Security Act 2001 (http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/2001/24/part/4/enacted) to detain certain foreign terror suspects. The House of Lords had to confront two key questions: whether there was a "public emergency threatening the life of the nation", and, if so, whether indefinite detention of foreign suspects was a necessary and lawful response to it. While eight of the nine judges in the House of Lords acknowledged that there were a public emergency, a clear majority refused to accept that the steps taken in response to it had been shown to be necessary. There are three videos in this series: - Part 1: https://youtu.be/a_BOYxQtZLs - Part 2: https://youtu.be/H6lCiMeworc - Part 3: https://youtu.be/lQNPuXtI_i0 A document supporting this video is available at: http://resources.law.cam.ac.uk/documents/heplus/constitutional-law-subject-extension-material-2.pdf
Views: 7170 Cambridge Law Faculty
Pippa Rogerson: Careers for Law Students
 
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Dr Pippa Rogerson discusses the career options for students who study the Law Degree at the University of Cambridge, including considering some of the possibilities other than entering the legal professions.
Views: 1732 Cambridge Law Faculty
'Devolution. Federation. Constitution. From here to where?': The 2015 Sir David Williams Lecture
 
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On Friday 27 February 2015, Laureate Professor Cheryl Saunders of the University of Melbourne delivered the 2014 Sir David Williams Lecture entitled "Devolution. Federation. Constitution. From here to where?". The Sir David Williams Lecture is an annual address delivered by a guest lecturer in honour of Sir David Williams, Emeritus Rouse Ball Professor of English Law and Emeritus Vice-Chancellor of Cambridge University. More information about this lecture, including photographs from the event, is available from the Centre for Public Law website at http://www.cpl.law.cam.ac.uk/sir_david_williams_lectures/
Views: 4127 Cambridge Law Faculty
Legal Problems: Professor Graham Virgo & Dr Janet O'Sullivan 2017
 
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The Faculty of Law holds an annual Open Day for undergraduate students, at which members of the Faculty discuss the Faculty, the Cambridge admissions system, and the benefits studying Law at Cambridge, The Open Day gives potential students, and their parents and teachers, a chance to look around the Faculty and the Squire Law Library, meet members of Faculty staff, and ask any questions they might have. In this lecture on 5 July 2017 Professor Graham Virgo and Dr Janet O'Sullivan gives attendees an idea of what a Law supervision is like, by leading a discussion on a handful of legal questions. The general talks given at this Open Day are available to watch or listen to via the University Streaming Media Service, iTunes U or YouTube. For more information about the Undergraduate BA Law Tripos Degree please refer to http://ba.law.cam.ac.uk
Views: 3950 Cambridge Law Faculty
'The evolution of vicarious liability': 2017 Allen & Overy Lecture
 
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On Wednesday 8 November 2017, Professor Simon Deakin of the University of Cambridge delivered the 2017 Cambridge Private Law Centre Allen & Overy Annual Law Lecture entitled "The evolution of vicarious liability". The event was kindly sponsored by Allen & Overy. More information about this lecture is available from the Private Law Centre website at www.privatelaw.law.cam.ac.uk/events/past-events
Views: 1614 Cambridge Law Faculty
'Constitutionalism and Private Law': 2015 Cambridge Freshfields Lecture
 
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On Wednesday 28 January 2015 Lord Hoffmann, Lord of Appeal in Ordinary from 1995 to 2009, delivered the 2015 Cambridge Freshfields Lecture entitled "Constitutionalism and Private Law". The Cambridge Freshfields Lecture is an annual address delivered by a guest of the Cambridge Private Law Centre, and the event is sponsored by Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer. More information about this lecture, including photographs from the event, is available from the Private Law Centre website at http://www.privatelaw.law.cam.ac.uk/events/past-events
Views: 10039 Cambridge Law Faculty
Studying Law at Cambridge: Gemma
 
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Third year Law student Gemma explains a little bit about what her experience of studying law has been like at the University of Cambridge.
Views: 10724 Cambridge Law Faculty
Amy Goymour: Civil (Roman) Law I
 
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Ms Amy Goymour discusses the study of Civil (Roman) Law I at the Faculty of Law, University of Cambridge.
Law Subject Extension: Law of Tort: Part 3
 
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Tort law is a collection of legal rules and ideas which protect you from harm and vindicates many of your rights but you probably haven't hear of it that much unless you've already looked at legal questions. The most famous tort is negligence, one you might have heard of. In this module you'll look at a case within the tort of negligence called Nettleship v Weston from 1971 (http://www.bailii.org/ew/cases/EWCA/C...). The key question in the case was how much care the driver of a care should take when driving on the road. From such a simple question you'll be able to engage with incredibly difficult issues such as what it means to be at fault, what risks we actually accept compared to what risks we do accept in life and who ultimately should pay for harm done in society. You can also read one of the judgments of one of the twentieth century's most famous and most fascinating judges! There are three videos in this series: - Part 1: https://youtu.be/mjoQAXVQ2oQ - Part 2: https://youtu.be/h9-B-jTgPio - Part 3: https://youtu.be/3vBnR8SbnzE There are three worksheets with questions for you to consider, which can be done alongside the videos and the case. There are also three further documents, containing more depth and detail on the videos themselves, in case you find text more useful than videos: - Worksheet 3: http://resources.law.cam.ac.uk/documents/heplus/tort_law_subject_extension_worksheet_3.pdf - Further exploration 3: http://resources.law.cam.ac.uk/documents/heplus/tort_law_subject_extension_further_study_3.pdf
Views: 3611 Cambridge Law Faculty
Joanna Miles: Criminal Law
 
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Ms Joanna Miles discusses the study of Criminal Law on the undergraduate Tripos Law Degree at the Faculty of Law, University of Cambridge.
Views: 1969 Cambridge Law Faculty
Law Lectures and Supervisions: Will
 
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Will talks about the differences between lectures and supervisions, and the way they work together to deliver the undergraduate Law degree at Cambridge.
Views: 2018 Cambridge Law Faculty
'The lion beneath the throne: law as history': The 2016 Sir David Williams Lecture
 
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On Friday 4 March 2016, Sir Stephen Sedley delivered the 2016 Sir David Williams Lecture entitled "The lion beneath the throne: law as history". The Sir David Williams Lecture is an annual address delivered by a guest lecturer in honour of Sir David Williams, Emeritus Rouse Ball Professor of English Law and Emeritus Vice-Chancellor of Cambridge University. More information about this lecture, including photographs from the event, is available from the Centre for Public Law website at: http://www.cpl.law.cam.ac.uk/sir-david-williams-lectures
Views: 2738 Cambridge Law Faculty