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Paria Canyon/Vermilion Cliffs Wilderness - A Lasting Legacy
 
17:00
In Utah, the spectacular Paria Canyon/Vermillion Cliffs Wilderness Area is about 45 miles east of Kanab. The Wilderness area encompasses 112,000 acres of redrock canyons and upthrust fault mountains. Coyote Buttes is a Special Management Area of the Paria Canyon/Vermilion Cliffs Wilderness. It has become one of the most popular destinations for many people visiting the Colorado Plateau. It is colorful but fragile Navajo Sandstone slickrock. The attraction is the thin ledges that swirl in wild contours of color and stone that are Coyotte Buttes Northvery brittle and breakable. It has grown as an attraction over the years due to the many published photographs and other media coverage of this small area. Nature has fully used its imagination to converge with the appreciation of our individual minds in all their variety of thought and wonder. Before highways and railways, before pioneers, even before Columbus...the land we know as the United States was truly a vast wilderness. To protect these last remaining areas, in 1984, Congress created the Paria Canyon/Vermilion Cliffs Wilderness. Coyote Buttes' outstanding scenery, desert wildlife, colorful history, and opportunities for primitive recreation will remain free from the influence of man and are protected in this condition for future generations. Its 112,000 acres beckon adventurers who yearn for solitude, scenic splendor, and the chance to explore one of the most beautiful geologic formations in the world. Learn about permits for this area http://on.doi.gov/2SEPaQ You can also find us on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/BLMUtah
Views: 283235 BLMNational
Interactive Mountain Biking Maps for Trails on BLM Lands
 
02:22
The Bureau of Land Management, also known as the BLM, offers thousands of mountain biking trails that exist all over the nation—from backyard to backcountry. The top 20 Mountain Bike Trails are now available on BLM’s national mountain bike webpage at www.blm.gov/mountainbike. These trails are close to camping, hiking and other recreational opportunities. Now it’s easier than ever to access your public lands through interactive recreation maps—giving you a fresh way to plan your trip! You’ll find helpful information and maps that are easy to use on smartphones, tablets, and other mobile devices. Each year, over a million mountain bikers ride on BLM-managed trails- that’s over 40 million hours of riding on public lands! These trails exist in a diversity of landscapes for superb mountain biking opportunities, from southwest desert singletracks that offer fun and scenic rides for beginners, to optimized trails that provide a range of unique experiences in the pacific west. The BLM provides outstanding recreational experiences with the help of our national and local partners. Our focus on connecting with communities to create sustainable opportunities for recreation would not be possible without our volunteers and partner groups who help create and maintain these special places for you to enjoy! So go online now and plan your visit to discover one of many BLM’s mountain bike trails today!
Views: 13952 BLMNational
02 - Surveying the Land
 
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This 13 part series, known as Fractured Land Patterns, is the history of BLM. It was created in the mid 1980's as an interpretation of BLMs colorful history. The historical perspective presented centers around the uses, federal laws, and landmark events on Americas public lands which contributed to the fractured land ownership patterns that remain today. The series is divided into 2 broad sections the first is called The Public Disposal Era and consists of videos 1 - 6. The second is called Conservation and Beyond and covers videos 7 -13. The thirteen chapters in this chronology trace the settlement of the West from colonial times through the passage of the Federal Land Policy and Management Act of 1976 (FLPMA), which provides BLM with its multiple use mission. Set against the backdrop of dynamic economic, social, and environmental change, and with shifting national priorities, this series explains how the missions of the General Land Office and the U.S. Grazing Service were merged with a stroke of the pen by President Harry S. Truman in 1946 to create the Bureau of Land Management Disclaimer: The opinions and statements of non-BLM personnel are included to illustrate alternative points of view at the time and do not necessarily represent the official position of the BLM.
Views: 14422 BLMNational
#FindYourWay on BLM-managed rivers and trails
 
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The Bureau of Land Management is celebrating the 50th Anniversary of the Wild and Scenic Rivers and National Trails Acts. Take a journey through Montana's Upper Missouri Rivers Breaks, where the Lewis and Clark and Nez Perce National Historic Trails follow the Upper Missouri River Wild and Scenic River. #FindYourWay on rivers and trails to celebrate 50 years of the Wild and Scenic Rivers and National Trails Systems. We invite everyone to explore these remarkable places to enjoy and learn about our country’s diverse landscapes and history. For more information on the 50th anniversary celebration this year, please visit www.blm.gov/rivers-trails-50. This film was made possible through our partnerships with the American Hiking Society and the Partnership for the National Trails System.
Views: 11203 BLMNational
#DiscoverWilderness: What is Wilderness?
 
02:11
The Bureau of Land Management's National Conservation Lands comprise more than 27 million acres located primarily in the West; these lands are recognized for their spectacular ecological, cultural, historic, recreational, and scientific value. National Conservation Lands include approximately 8.7 million acres of Wilderness in 221 units containing some of the wildest and most remote lands in America. These lands are part of the National Wilderness Preservation System, established by the Wilderness Act of 1964. The Act established long-term preservation and protection to areas on federal lands that were largely undeveloped, natural, and unconstrained by human activity, and which provided outstanding opportunities for solitude or primitive and unconfined recreation. Wilderness land, mostly made up of area over 5,000 acres, consist of rugged mountain ranges, broad valleys, and desert plains that include the surviving remnants of the vast natural landscape that once covered all of North America. Along with the BLM, Wilderness lands are managed by the U.S. Forest Service, National Park Service, and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. #DiscoverWilderness and Put the WILD Back Into Your Life!
Views: 5776 BLMNational
Padre
 
06:14
On September 29, 2010, Padre', a 10-year old mustang born in the wild and adopted through the BLM, took his chance at making history by competing in the Four Year Old and Older in Hand Stallion Division at the most prestigious dressage show in the United States, Dressage at Devon. Padre, under saddle for less than 18 months, not only became the first mustang to compete at Dressage at Devon, but took home 1st place in the Four Year Old and Older Stallions (in hand only) category. Padre's other results were as follows: 4th Place, Mature Horse Championship 3rd Place, Great American Ins. Group/USDF Stallion Championship Reserve Grand Champion, Stallion Championship
Views: 11114 BLMNational
Bloomington Cave
 
10:12
Bloomington Cave is the most extensive and well-known cave in the St. George Field Office. It is a large tectonic cave, and has at least six distinct levels and a maze of passages that are generally narrow, often with steeply dipping floors. The surveyed length of the cave is currently 1.39 miles (7,340 feet), making it the fifth longest cave in Utah. In 1994, this cave was listed as a significant cave on federal lands, under the authority and mandate of the Federal Cave Resources Protection Act (FCRPA) of 1988. This cave's difficulty level is currently unrated. However, many users who are not experienced cavers have found the cave much more difficult than expected. Bloomington Cave requires crawling, squeezing through tight passages, climbing, and moving on slippery surfaces. Five routes are marked within the cave. View the Cave Routes page to see these routes and to read a description of their challenges. The temperature within Bloomington Cave is 58 degrees year-round, but its high humidity often makes it feel warmer. Anyone wishing to enter Bloomington Cave must have a permit. The permit is free and available from the St. George Field Office. To find out how to obtain a permit -- click here.
Views: 6485 BLMNational
The BLM Cadastral Surveys Program: A Public Land Heritage
 
06:47
From the nation's first surveys of public land after the Revolutionary War, to current efforts to sustain the health, diversity, and productivity of the public lands, the BLM's Cadastral Surveys program is the latest chapter in America's public land heritage.
Views: 3056 BLMNational
Meet The Jackson Interagency Hotshot Crew (JIHC) or Jackson Hotshots
 
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The Southeastern States District Office in Jackson, MS is home to the only BLM Hotshot Crew east of the Mississippi River. Since being formed in 1997, the Jackson Hotshots have fought disastrous wildland fires from Alaska to Florida. In addition, they have been called upon to assist with numerous National emergencies, including Ground Zero after 9/11/01 and search and recovery operations from the Space Shuttle Columbia. The Hotshots were also available for recovery efforts following several devastating hurricanes, including Katrina, Rita and Sandy. The Jackson Hotshots, including their operation and outreach, is supported by the Historically Black Colleges and Universities as well as the International Association of Black Professional Firefighters Foundation. The IABPFF entered into an agreement with the BLM in 1996 to expand opportunities in the wildland firefighting community for African-Americans. Watch the video profile of the Jackson Hotshots!
Views: 6198 BLMNational
Desolation Gray Canyons River Permit
 
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Want to run a river? Want to experience the beautiful scenery of canyons in central Utah? Desolation Gray Canyons of the Green River may just be what you want. The 84-mile trip from Sand Wash to Swaseys Rapid offers outstanding scenery, interesting geologic formations, evidence of prehistoric and historic human activity, and whitewater opportunities. A permit is required year round for floating the Desolation Gray Canyons section of the Green River. Permits can be reserved at www.recreation.gov. River Information: The Green River enters Desolation Canyon just north of Sand Wash as it exits the Uinta Basin. Canyon walls are stream and lake deposits of the Eocene age then transition into the Cretaceous delta and sea deposits of Gray Canyon. Along the river, the riparian zone holds willow, cottonwood, box elder and other woody riparian species and provides critical habitat to neo-tropical migrant birds, nesting waterfowl, and wintering deer and elk. Moving away from the cool shade of the riparian zone, one immediately enters a desert environment dominated by salt shrubs and bunch grasses. There is a small sagebrush zone that gives way to pinyon and juniper slopes. The view is always dominated by rock and cliff. Douglas fir finds a home in protected, well watered alcoves. Over sixty riffles and rapids punctuate the trip. None are particularly difficult – a dozen or so can cause some trouble for the unprepared traveler. Camping tends to be idyllic on a clean sandy beach in front of a grove of cottonwood trees which offer shade and a windbreak. More than 60 side canyons descend from the plateau to meet the Green River. Every side canyon holds a surprise. In a few, a cold, clear stream pours into a warm silty river. Prehistoric rock art is prolific along with the ruins of dwellings, towers and granaries. Between Sand Wash and Nefertiti Rapid, users set their own itinerary. There are a number of hiking trails in the canyon. Of the 84 mile long river segment, 66 miles are within the Desolation Canyon Wilderness Study Area – the largest in the lower 48 states. The Desolation Canyon National Historic Landmark (NHL) extends one mile on either side of the river from Nine Mile Creek to Florence Creek. The NHL was designated by the Secretary of the Interior in 1969 as part of the centennial celebration of the 1869 exploration of the Green and Colorado Rivers by John Wesley Powell. There is a primitive boat ramp at Sand Wash, a primitive eight-site campground, a contact/information station, staffed ranger station and toilets. Trash receptacles and water are not provided. With the remoteness of the area groups can camp the night before at Sand Wash. Due to frequent mosquito plagues, Sand Wash offers four campsites with screened cabins. This contrasts with the more developed Swaseys Boat Ramp where there is a large concrete boat ramp along with improved parking, toilets and trash removal services. The east side of the river, above Coal Creek is Ute Tribal Land. Hiking and camping on Ute lands is allowed with a permit from the Ute Tribe. After a valid Bureau of Land Management permit has been acquired, a Ute Tribal permit may be purchased at www.uitfwd.com/Doc/desolationCanyonPermit.html . The Ute Indian Tribe would like you to experience nature’s beauty but would like you to remember that you are a visitor to their lands. The Ute people hold cultural resources in highest regard. Respect all features and aesthetics of the area so that future generations can also share first-hand, nature’s order and magnificence.
Views: 14708 BLMNational
Intro to the BLM Assessment, Inventory and Monitoring (AIM) Strategy
 
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Healthy ecosystems support the many benefits and uses of public lands. Land managers require information about ecosystem conditions and how they are changing to manage and sustain landscapes. The BLM Assessment, Inventory, and Monitoring (AIM) Strategy identifies four principles for gathering high-quality information to guide land management. BLM'ers are applying those principles to manage ecosystems at multiple scales from Arizona to Alaska. The AIM Strategy is part of the BLM's broader Landscape Approach to managing over 245 million acres of public lands. To learn more about the Landscape Approach and AIM, see our website: http://www.blm.gov/wo/st/en/prog/more/Landscape_Approach.html Be sure to watch video in 4K!
Views: 4040 BLMNational
#DiscoverWilderness: Riding Into Wilderness
 
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In recognition of the 50th anniversary of the Wilderness Act (Sept. 3, 2014), BLM-Utah’s intrepid adventure crew recently set out on a unique backpacking trip in southwestern Utah. Their mission: Gain vital perspective and knowledge, and interview a broad range of user groups while hiking through some of the most pristine, undeveloped lands in our nation. Ranging from red rock deserts to folded and swirling geologic cliffs, to deep river canyons; the BLM manages 16 wilderness areas in southern Utah, encompassing a total of 154,353 acres. These areas are special places, essentially undisturbed by human activities, and ranging in size from the 32 acre Taylor Creek Wilderness to the 44,530 acre Canaan Mountain Wilderness. Exploring two of the hairiest, yet accessible wildernesses in southwest Utah, the crew looks to familiarize public land users with Utah wilderness, garnering a sense of enlightenment with regard to the many great uses and benefits these places provide, along with the precautions and etiquette necessary for traveling in such primitive areas. Please join us in celebrating 50 years of Wilderness. #DiscoverWilderness and Put the WILD back into your life!
Views: 4042 BLMNational
Interagency Engine Operator Workshop
 
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The Engine Operator Workshop (ENOP) has been designed to enhance the knowledge, skills and abilities of employees currently working in Engine Operator positions, and to provide a broader understanding of engine modules. The intent of the ENOP workshop is to teach the safe and effective use of engines in the wildland fire environment, and to provide an opportunity for hands-on training. Engine modules make up the bulk of the Bureau's suppression forces, and the effective use of engines is critical for managing fires safely and efficiently during both initial and extended attack. Learn more about the Interagency Engine Operator Workshop at http://www.utahfireinfo.gov/training/engine_opworkshop.html.
Views: 871 BLMNational
Bear River Bonneville Cutthroat Trout Reintroduction
 
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After nearly eight years, a project started in 2008 by BLM-Utah, Utah-DWR and Trout Unlimited to continues to successfully increase native fish populations in northern Utah. In fact, the partnership’s proactive approach to native fish conservation has helped keep Bear River Bonneville Cutthroat trout from listing as a threatened or endangered species! Yesterday (Oct. 15, 2015), a team of fish experts reintroduced 5,600 young cutthroat into seven miles of Randolph Creek in beautiful Rich County. Yesterday's reintroduction would not have been possible without the support of private landowners in the area, and the 5,600 released are just the beginning of a larger-scale project that will reintroduce several native fish species to 40 miles of the stream system. Partnerships drive ongoing conservation efforts like this one and BLM-Utah looks forward to more team efforts in the years ahead. Good news for anglers from yesterday's reintroduction—the cutthroat are expected to be large enough to fish either late next summer or the following spring!
Views: 1237 BLMNational
NATIONAL CONSERVATION LANDS
 
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This year marks an important milestone for the BLM's National Conservation Lands - America’s newest conservation system is 15 years old. Today, these National Conservation Lands include 874 federally recognized areas and more than 30 million acres of National Monuments, National Conservation Areas, Wilderness Areas, Wilderness Study Areas, Wild and Scenic Rivers, National Scenic and Historic Trails, and Conservation Lands of the California Desert. We invite you to celebrate with us, and VISIT, SHARE, and SUPPORT your National Conservation Lands throughout the year. VISIT any of the anniversary events or some of the 874 sites in the system of the BLM’s National Conservation Lands. Find an event: www.blm.gov/wo/st/en/prog/blm_special_areas/national_cons... SHARE your experiences on National Conservation Lands with hashtags #conservationlands15 and #findyourpark on social media. View the Twitter conversation: twitter.com/hashtag/conservationlands15 SUPPORT National Conservation Lands through organized restoration events, National Public Lands Day activities, and other service opportunities. Learn about how you can support National Conservation Lands: www.blm.gov/wo/st/en/prog/blm_special_areas/national_cons... These National Conservation Lands are managed to conserve, protect, and restore nationally significant landscapes that have outstanding cultural, ecological, and scientific values for current and future generations. This photo album includes high-quality photos of National Conservation Lands units hosting #conservationlands15 celebration events.
Views: 1593 BLMNational
Utah Wildfire Academy
 
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The twelfth annual Utah Wildfire Academy will be held May 14-18, 2012 at the Snow College South Campus in Richfield, Utah. During the past 12 years, the Utah Wildfire Academy has trained over 4,300 students in numerous aspects of fire suppression and management. Students ranging in ages from 18-70 have come to the academy from nearly every state across the nation. The academy is set up under the Incident Command System, similar to what the students will experience when working on a real wildfire. The Utah Wildfire Academy is one of many comprehensive fire academies nationwide and is a cooperative effort between the Bureau of Land Management, U.S. Forest Service, the State of Utah, Bureau of Indian Affairs, the National Park Service and Snow College. The courses will train rookie and veteran firefighters from volunteer departments and county, state and federal fire agencies. The classes range from basic firefighting techniques to incident command management. Snow College South in Richfield has become the permanent home of the academy where it has been held 10 years out of 12. For more information visit http://www.utahfireinfo.gov/
Views: 834 BLMNational
Celebrate Your Lands!
 
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This year, BLM celebrates the 40th Anniversary of the Federal Land Policy and Management Act (FLPMA), a federal law that provides direction for the BLM to sustain the health, diversity and productivity of America’s public lands for the use and enjoyment of present and future generations. October 21 is the 40th anniversary of this remarkable legislation. Please join us in celebrating our history as we work every day to manage your public lands for the benefit of both present and future generations.
Views: 3614 BLMNational
Old Spanish Trail Adventure
 
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Recently, three American Conservation Experience (ACE) interns working for the BLM-Utah National Trails Program embarked on a truly unique adventure. Trekking more than 400 miles along the Old Spanish National Historic Trail (OST) in southern Utah, the adventurers set out to meet Interior Secretary Jewell's recent challenge "...to inspire millions of young people to play, learn, serve and work outdoors." Joined by BLM-Utah's new media lead and videographer, the #OSTadventure crew captivated a national audience as they documented their journey along the historical route, live on a myriad of social platforms. Joined by a BLM or trail association field expert at each juncture, the crew searched for traces of the past -- sharing the adventure online, viewers experienced and engaged in the highs and lows of the trip. Each day the #OSTadventure crew connected the dots as they discovered Utah's rich culture, history, and beauty. Whether on foot, bike, or horse, the crew worked with local field offices to highlight adjacent recreation resources as they visited cultural sites and landscapes associated with the historic trail. Engaging more than a quarter of a million viewers LIVE online, the intrepid #OSTadventure crew found the perfect mix of substance and excitement. To commemorate their adventure the crew developed a video highlighting their journey. We are pleased to premiere it here for everyone today. It effectively captures the youthful spirit of the trip and is geared toward millennials in search of adventure in America's great outdoors. Find more on Instagram and Twitter using #OSTadventure. Daily recaps from the adventure are also available on Tumblr at http://mypubliclands.tumblr.com/tagged/ostadventure. For more information about National Historic Trails, stop by a local BLM field office or visit http://on.doi.gov/1e72ZKo.
Views: 17074 BLMNational
#DiscoverWilderness: Cedar Mountain Wilderness
 
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The Cedar Mountain Wilderness Area was officially designated by Congress and the President in January 2006 and encompasses approximately 100,000 acres of public land 50 miles due west of Salt Lake City, just south of Interstate 80. The Cedar Mountain Wilderness provides visitors with an excellent example of the Great Basin ecosystem that stretches from the Wasatch Front in Utah to the Sierra Nevada Mountains in California. This arid desert mountain range forms the western boundary of Skull Valley and got its name from the area's juniper trees which are sometimes referred to as cedars. Vegetation in the Cedar Mountains transitions rapidly from Great Basin salt desert shrub covered plains at 4,600 feet to sagebrush/juniper woodlands and native bunch grasses at elevations over 6,000 feet. Topography generally consists of flat plains and benches that rise rapidly to higher elevations characterized by rounded slopes and shallow canyons. Maximum elevation is 7700 feet. The wilderness area is long and narrow, running north to south for 32 miles along the length of the Cedar Mountains with a maximum width of only 7 miles. There are natural springs that support both native wildlife, livestock, and wild horses. For centuries the Native Americans lived in and used the Cedar Mountains for hunting and gathering food. The first white European visitors were most likely trappers exploring the area around the Great Salt Lake. The first documented visit occurred with the John C. Fremont expedition sponsored by the U.S. Government in 1845. Lansford W. Hastings would later identify a portion of his shortcut route on the California emigrant trail across the northern portion of the Cedar Mountains, lending his name to Hastings Pass. This was an crucial part of the route of the ill fated Donner--Reed party and it is an important section of the California National Historic Trail. The last water available to pioneer parties before the 80 mile waterless crossing of the Great Salt Lake basin to Donner Spring is located in the Cedar Mountains. #DiscoverWilderness and Put the WILD Back Into Your Life!
Views: 1479 BLMNational
#FindYourWay: BLM-managed rivers and trails
 
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Join us in celebrating the 50th anniversary of the Wild & Scenic Rivers and National Trails System Acts! Leading up to the anniversary on October 2, 2018, the Bureau of Land Management and our partners invite visitors from all backgrounds to #FindYourWay and explore America’s vast system of designated rivers and trails. From Blue Ribbon trout waters to small desert rivers, to the iconic Iditarod and Pony Express National Historic Trails and the Continental Divide National Scenic Trail, BLM-managed rivers and trails include some of America's most adored landscapes, historic features and recreation adventures. This anniversary provides the opportunity to highlight all of our nation’s rivers and trails and encourages Americans to enjoy the public lands that speak to our natural and cultural legacy.
Views: 384 BLMNational
Connecting with Utah Communities: Outdoor Recreation Strategy
 
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DescripThe Bureau of Land Management (BLM)-Utah has released a new five-year strategy for its Recreation and Visitor Services Program. The new strategy, “Connecting with Utah Communities,” aims to position the resources of the BLM’s Recreation and Visitor Services Program to achieve the social, economic, and environmental goals of the communities located near Utah’s public land while expanding the outdoor recreation to public land visitors. “This strategy confirms that BLM-Utah’s Recreation and Visitor Services Program is firmly committed to a community-based approach to outdoor recreation management,” said Jenna Whitlock, acting BLM-Utah State Director. “We welcome all interested stakeholders to partner with us to identify and achieve our common goals for Utah’s public land visitors.” “Connecting with Utah Communities” calls for BLM-Utah to increase its collaborative efforts with local communities, businesses, and other outdoor recreation service providers in order to provide public land visitors with the recreational opportunities and experiences that communities value most. Utah Office of Tourism Managing Director Vicki Varela said the new strategy will help travelers make the most of the opportunities and unique experiences they seek during travel. “The ‘Connecting with Utah Communities’ is helping the Utah Office of Tourism connect visitors to Utah's stunning natural resources, and leading to discovery of landscapes that are off the beaten path," Varela said. Ashley Korenblat, managing director of Public Land Solutions, said this strategy lays the foundation for long-term sustainable opportunities for tourism and outdoor recreation in our local communities. “With more coordination among cities, counties, volunteer groups, and the BLM, we can create and improve recreation assets around the state that will attract both visitors and quality-of-life recruits–people who want to move their businesses to Utah because of the incredible public land.” In 2015, Utah’s public land provided over 7.5 million visitors with a wide variety of world class outdoor recreation opportunities, which supported almost 4,500 jobs and contributed $460 million in economic activity to the state of Utah. BLM-Utah’s new five-year Recreation and Visitor Services strategy can be found on our website at http://on.doi.gov/20FGLO6. Join the conversation! Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/BLMUtah Twitter - https://twitter.com/blmutah
Views: 485 BLMNational
The Story of America's Wild Horses and Burros
 
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Released May 2012 - Produced by the Bureau of Land Management, this video helps us better understand how the BLM came to manage federally protected wild horses and burros on millions of acres of public lands across the West. Current and former BLM employees, historians, horse advocates, and others tell their parts of this continuing story. From the DVD Cover: The public lands of the Western United States are diverse, ruggedly beautiful, and majestic - as are the horses and burros that live there. These animals are born with the colors of the land upon them. The browns, blacks, reds, blues, dapple grays, and snowy whites all reflect nature's paint brush. Today, America's wild horses and burros are found in 10 western states. It is the BLM's responsibility to preserve and protect healthy herds of wild free-roaming horses and burros as components of the public lands. The Wild Horse Annie Act of 1959 and the Wild Free-Roaming Horses and Burros Act of 1971 gave wild horses and burros a legal right to live on public lands without harassment. The Adopt-A-Horse or Burro Program was initiated in 1973 to meet the challenges of balancing the health of public lands with the health of the wild horses and burros. To read about many adoption success stories, go to www.facebook.com/BLMWildhorseandburro. To learn how you can adopt a wild horse or burro, visit www.blm.gov, call 866-4-Mustangs (866-468-7826) or email wildhorse@blm.gov.
Views: 655913 BLMNational
Wild Burro Gather: Cibola-Trigo HMA
 
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Between September 28 and September 30, 2010, the BLM gathered and removed 100 wild burros from the Cibola-Trigo Herd Management Area in southwestern Arizona and extreme southeastern California. The HMA, located about 20 miles north of Yuma, supports populations of wild burros and horses which use lands administered by the U.S. Army Yuma Proving Ground, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and the BLM. The Appropriate Management Level (AML) for wild burros in the Cibola-Trigo HMA is 165. A population survey completed in May 2010 estimated that there are approximately 600 wild burros within the Cibola-Trigo HMA. The BLM gathered and remove 100 burros to relieve grazing use in one of the more heavily utilized areas of the HMA. Animals removed from the Cibola-Trigo HMA will be available for adoption once they are vaccinated, wormed, and freeze-marked. These remarkable burros are highly desirable, and the BLM expects them to be in high demand. The animals removed will be transported the BLM Ridgecrest Regional Wild Horse and Burro Facility. To adopt a Cibola-Trigo burro, contact the BLM at 1-866-4MUSTANGS.
Views: 11245 BLMNational
10 - The Dust Bowl Era
 
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This 13 part series, known as Fractured Land Patterns, is the history of BLM. It was created in the mid 1980's as an interpretation of BLMs colorful history. The historical perspective presented centers around the uses, federal laws, and landmark events on Americas public lands which contributed to the fractured land ownership patterns that remain today. The series is divided into 2 broad sections the first is called The Public Disposal Era and consists of videos 1 - 6. The second is called Conservation and Beyond and covers videos 7 -13. The thirteen chapters in this chronology trace the settlement of the West from colonial times through the passage of the Federal Land Policy and Management Act of 1976 (FLPMA), which provides BLM with its multiple use mission. Set against the backdrop of dynamic economic, social, and environmental change, and with shifting national priorities, this series explains how the missions of the General Land Office and the U.S. Grazing Service were merged with a stroke of the pen by President Harry S. Truman in 1946 to create the Bureau of Land Management Disclaimer: The opinions and statements of non-BLM personnel are included to illustrate alternative points of view at the time and do not necessarily represent the official position of the BLM.
Views: 5234 BLMNational
Moccasin Mountain Dinosaur Tracksite
 
09:19
Follow the paths dinosaurs took more than 180 million years ago at the Moccasin Mountain Dinosaur Tracksite in southwestern Utah. Hundreds, if not thousands of 185 million-year-old tracks from at least six different types of animals are well preserved in slick rock outcrops in an area about the size of a football field.
Views: 2333 BLMNational
Camp Kwiyamuntsi: Rich Heritage, Bright Futures for Southern Paiute Youth
 
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Every August, BLM-Utah and its sister agencies partner with the Paiute Indian Tribe of Utah to host outdoor fun and learning for native youth at Camp Kwiyamuntsi (Kwee-YAH-moonts). Located on traditional homelands now managed by federal agencies, Camp Kwiyamuntsi provides Paiute middle-schoolers with opportunities to experience the many ways their unique cultural heritage intersects with modern science and natural resources management. Camps like Camp Kwiyamuntsi connect new generations of native youth to the natural world and each other.
Views: 1003 BLMNational
Hastings Cutoff - Retracing the Footsteps of the Donner-Reed Party
 
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Travel back in time and experience the adventure as three interns retrace the fateful steps of the Donner-Reed Party, traveling the ninety-mile waterless stretch of the California Trail known as Hastings Cutoff. This alternate route, sold as a 'shortcut' across the Great Salt Desert (Utah) by Lansford W. Hastings in 1846, proved devastating for the Donner-Reed Party and many who attempted the perilous journey. Now designated as a National Historic Trail, Hastings Cutoff is considered by many as the most arduous stretch of Western migration trail in the United States. Bureau of Land Management, Utah Website: http://on.doi.gov/1ryaH7d
Views: 28580 BLMNational
03 - The Early Disposal Policies
 
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This 13 part series, known as Fractured Land Patterns, is the history of BLM. It was created in the mid 1980's as an interpretation of BLMs colorful history. The historical perspective presented centers around the uses, federal laws, and landmark events on Americas public lands which contributed to the fractured land ownership patterns that remain today. The series is divided into 2 broad sections the first is called The Public Disposal Era and consists of videos 1 - 6. The second is called Conservation and Beyond and covers videos 7 -13. The thirteen chapters in this chronology trace the settlement of the West from colonial times through the passage of the Federal Land Policy and Management Act of 1976 (FLPMA), which provides BLM with its multiple use mission. Set against the backdrop of dynamic economic, social, and environmental change, and with shifting national priorities, this series explains how the missions of the General Land Office and the U.S. Grazing Service were merged with a stroke of the pen by President Harry S. Truman in 1946 to create the Bureau of Land Management Disclaimer: The opinions and statements of non-BLM personnel are included to illustrate alternative points of view at the time and do not necessarily represent the official position of the BLM.
Views: 1532 BLMNational
Saving an Endangered Species and a Trail One Fence Post at a Time
 
03:53
The Red Bluff Area of Critical Concern (ACEC), just outside St. George, is known for its fun and flowy mountain bike trails. It also happens to be one of the few places where the Dwarf Bear Claw Poppy thrives. After consultation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and through an Environmental Assessment, the Dwarf Bear Claw Poppy was determined endangered and necessary measures would be needed to save the species, or the ACEC would be limited or closed to recreationalists. In an effort to conserve the endangered species and the Bear Claw Poppy Mountain Biking Trail, the BLM enlisted the help of an American Conservation Experience (ACE) crew. Through hard manual labor, the crew installed split rail fences to minimize impacts to the endangered Dwarf Bear Claw Poppy while maintaining access for recreational public lands users. “Erosion, invasive plants, and wildfire greatly impact critical seed banks found in the soil—and that’s what we’re trying to protect,” said John Kellam, BLM-Utah St. George Field Office Wildlife Biologist. But the project goal is twofold, “We’re trying to mitigate and protect the habitat and allow for recreational use along the trail system”. According to project lead Kyle Voyles, BLM-Utah St. George Field Office Outdoor Recreation Planner, fence construction began in March. But, the project’s location inside the ACEC posed real logistical challenges for finishing the project in a timely manner. “The Red Bluff ACEC is a non-motorized area—so we can’t use ATV’s to get the supplies in,” Voyles said. In phase 1, crews hauled equipment in manually including augers, hand tools, generators and drills and all of the posts which weigh 22-26 pounds each. To complete the project expeditiously, BLM contracted a helicopter for phase 2. With the help of fire crews from BLM Arizona Strip, Dixie National Forest and the National Park Service, crews were able to accomplish in four hours what it would take a crew an entire week to accomplish. Interestingly, the project wasn’t paid for with tax dollars but with fees paid directly to the BLM St. George Field Office from 120 Special Recreation Permit holders— outfitters and guides and race concessionaires for competitive events that operate on public lands. Through the Federal Lands Recreation Enhancement Act (REA) Congress determined that the funds paid to BLM for recreation—three percent of gross receipts—would remain in the same office and be spent on recreation. The funds earned through REA, is what funds projects like the Bear Claw Poppy fence project. “That’s how we build trails, that’s how we build trailheads, and that’s how we reached this compromise between the Endangered Species Act and recreational access,” said Dave Kiel, BLM Outdoor Recreation Planner.
Views: 468 BLMNational
BLM Wyoming Adobe Town Gather
 
03:28
Starting October 10, BLM Wyoming will gather approximately 1,950 wild horses from the Adobe Town - Salt Wells Herd Management Areas (HMAs) in Southwest Wyoming. The appropriate management level for the area is 860 animals. Around 100 mares will be treated with fertility control drugs and released back into the HMAs.
Views: 18628 BLMNational
09 - Oregon and California Timber
 
01:30
This 13 part series, known as Fractured Land Patterns, is the history of BLM. It was created in the mid 1980's as an interpretation of BLMs colorful history. The historical perspective presented centers around the uses, federal laws, and landmark events on Americas public lands which contributed to the fractured land ownership patterns that remain today. The series is divided into 2 broad sections the first is called The Public Disposal Era and consists of videos 1 - 6. The second is called Conservation and Beyond and covers videos 7 -13. The thirteen chapters in this chronology trace the settlement of the West from colonial times through the passage of the Federal Land Policy and Management Act of 1976 (FLPMA), which provides BLM with its multiple use mission. Set against the backdrop of dynamic economic, social, and environmental change, and with shifting national priorities, this series explains how the missions of the General Land Office and the U.S. Grazing Service were merged with a stroke of the pen by President Harry S. Truman in 1946 to create the Bureau of Land Management Disclaimer: The opinions and statements of non-BLM personnel are included to illustrate alternative points of view at the time and do not necessarily represent the official position of the BLM.
Views: 780 BLMNational
01 - The Lands That Remain and Series Introduction
 
04:13
This 13 part series, known as Fractured Land Patterns, is the history of BLM. It was created in the mid 1980's as an interpretation of BLMs colorful history. The historical perspective presented centers around the uses, federal laws, and landmark events on Americas public lands which contributed to the fractured land ownership patterns that remain today. The series is divided into 2 broad sections the first is called The Public Disposal Era and consists of videos 1 - 6. The second is called Conservation and Beyond and covers videos 7 -13. The thirteen chapters in this chronology trace the settlement of the West from colonial times through the passage of the Federal Land Policy and Management Act of 1976 (FLPMA), which provides BLM with its multiple use mission. Set against the backdrop of dynamic economic, social, and environmental change, and with shifting national priorities, this series explains how the missions of the General Land Office and the U.S. Grazing Service were merged with a stroke of the pen by President Harry S. Truman in 1946 to create the Bureau of Land Management Disclaimer: The opinions and statements of non-BLM personnel are included to illustrate alternative points of view at the time and do not necessarily represent the official position of the BLM.
Views: 2011 BLMNational
Multiple Use Mission
 
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The BLMs mission is to sustain the health and productivity of public lands for the use and enjoyment of present and future generations. More than 10,000 employees across the nation take the BLMs multiple-use mission on as their own. Hear about the work they do, and why they do it, in their own words.
Views: 485 BLMNational
BLM-Utah Engine Operator Workshop
 
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The Engine Operator Workshop (ENOP) is designed to enhance the knowledge, skills and abilities of employees currently working in Engine Operator positions, and to provide a broader understanding of engine modules. Established in 2002 by Ron Ellington and Terry Tilford from the Canyon Country District, the intent of the workshop is to teach the safe and effective use of engines in the wildland fire environment, and to provide an opportunity for hands-on training. Engine modules make up the bulk of the Bureau's suppression forces, and as such, the effective use of engines is critical for managing fires safely and efficiently during both initial and extended attack. This year, the workshop will run May 11-16, 2014, and has been relocated from Moab to Camp Williams in Salt Lake City through a partnership with the Utah National Guard.
Views: 1952 BLMNational
06 - The Mineral Frontier and Part I Conclusion
 
06:14
This 13 part series, known as Fractured Land Patterns, is the history of BLM. It was created in the mid 1980's as an interpretation of BLMs colorful history. The historical perspective presented centers around the uses, federal laws, and landmark events on Americas public lands which contributed to the fractured land ownership patterns that remain today. The series is divided into 2 broad sections the first is called The Public Disposal Era and consists of videos 1 - 6. The second is called Conservation and Beyond and covers videos 7 -13. The thirteen chapters in this chronology trace the settlement of the West from colonial times through the passage of the Federal Land Policy and Management Act of 1976 (FLPMA), which provides BLM with its multiple use mission. Set against the backdrop of dynamic economic, social, and environmental change, and with shifting national priorities, this series explains how the missions of the General Land Office and the U.S. Grazing Service were merged with a stroke of the pen by President Harry S. Truman in 1946 to create the Bureau of Land Management Disclaimer: The opinions and statements of non-BLM personnel are included to illustrate alternative points of view at the time and do not necessarily represent the official position of the BLM.
Views: 650 BLMNational
Riding the St Anthony Sand Dunes
 
01:09
Ever wonder what it's like to ride a sand rail? Check out this ride through the St. Anthony Sand Dunes-Egin Lake Access in Idaho.
Views: 817 BLMNational
Nature High Summer Camp
 
13:24
Hey students! Nature High Summer Camp is currently accepting applications! Nature High Summer Camp, located near Ephraim, Utah, is a perfect opportunity explore your interests in natural resources, meet new friends, and have a lot of fun in Utah's great outdoors. Natural resources specialists take students out in the field to learn about forestry, aquatics, wildlife, soils, and astronomy. The cost is only $50 for a FULL week of camp, and includes comfortable lodging and nutritious, tasty meals. The deadline is May 17th and up to 30 participants will be selected! Check out the Nature High Website to apply. http://naturehighcamp.com/ Friend us on Facebook! https://www.facebook.com/naturehigh.summercamp
Views: 2333 BLMNational
Douglas-Piceance Pregather Video
 
07:04
The White River Field Office (CO) manages the 190,000-acre Piceance East Douglas HMA for a healthy wild horse herd of between 135 and 235 wild horses.
Views: 1760 BLMNational
Improving Your Rangeland Using Mechanical Tools
 
02:51
Color Country District, BLM mechanically treats an average of 13,000 acres of public land annually. Primary objectives include restoring rangeland health for enhanced community fire protection, wildlife habitat, reducing soil erosion, increasing water quality and quantity, and increased productivity of the landscape. For more information on rangeland restoration projects in Utah, visit www.utahfireinfo.gov.
Views: 412 BLMNational
05 - Indian Lands
 
01:58
This 13 part series, known as Fractured Land Patterns, is the history of BLM. It was created in the mid 1980's as an interpretation of BLMs colorful history. The historical perspective presented centers around the uses, federal laws, and landmark events on Americas public lands which contributed to the fractured land ownership patterns that remain today. The series is divided into 2 broad sections the first is called The Public Disposal Era and consists of videos 1 - 6. The second is called Conservation and Beyond and covers videos 7 -13. The thirteen chapters in this chronology trace the settlement of the West from colonial times through the passage of the Federal Land Policy and Management Act of 1976 (FLPMA), which provides BLM with its multiple use mission. Set against the backdrop of dynamic economic, social, and environmental change, and with shifting national priorities, this series explains how the missions of the General Land Office and the U.S. Grazing Service were merged with a stroke of the pen by President Harry S. Truman in 1946 to create the Bureau of Land Management Disclaimer: The opinions and statements of non-BLM personnel are included to illustrate alternative points of view at the time and do not necessarily represent the official position of the BLM.
Views: 1045 BLMNational
BLM Public Meeting Video Presentation
 
19:28
This 20-minute video presentation provides a project overview of the Northern Arizona Proposed Mineral Withdrawal Environmental Impact Statement (EIS), including the project history, Cooperating Agency involvement, National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) EIS process, and how susbtantive comments can be made on the Draft EIS during the 45-day comment period from February 18 through April 4. The same presentation will also be part of the public meetings scheduled on March 1 in Phoenix, AZ; March 8 in Flagstaff, AZ; March 9 in Fredonia, AZ; and March 10 in Salt Lake City, UT. Extensive information on the Draft EIS is posted on BLM's external webpage at http://www.blm.gov/az/st/en/prog/mining/timeout.html
Views: 494 BLMNational
2008 Rangeland Stewardship Awards
 
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Profile of Chris Black of Joseph Black & Sons, Bruneau, Idaho, who won the BLM 2008 Rangeland Stewardship Award for enhancing sagebrush and riparian habitat in the Big Springs, Idaho, grazing allotment. Chris was honored for a monitoring program that led to fewer invasive species, increased groundwater, and an impressive growth in the population of sage-grouse and bighorn sheep.
Views: 443 BLMNational
Rojo Trail Highlights - BLM Vernal Field Office, Utah
 
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The Rojo mountain bike trail is an advanced technical flow trail on BLM public lands near Vernal, Utah. With deep craters, large drops, and technical turns, this trail, nicknamed "Carnage," is not for the faint of heart. Vernal Field Office recreation staff recommends hiking the trail before you ride it, or riding with an experienced local rider. Remember to take first aid supplies and a lot of water as summer riding in Vernal can be hot and unforgiving! For more information, call 435-781-4400. We'll see you soon!
Views: 974 BLMNational
Jazz-Chromolly Trail Highlights - Vernal, Utah
 
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The BLM's Jazz-Chromolly Trail in Vernal, Utah, is a first-class bike trail. As part of the Red Fleet Trails complex, Jazz-Chromolly combines flowing, winding segments with technical sections and challenging climbs. It crosses desert sands, slick rock and offers panoramic views of Red Fleet Reservoir, the Brush Creek Drainage and the Battleships formations, which give the Red Fleet Trails Complex its name. Jazz-Chromolly has something for both intermediate and advanced riders and riders can link with the J-Boy and Handsome Cabin Boy Trails for an amazing mountain biking experience. For more information, contact the BLM Vernal Field Office at (435) 781-4400. The riders featured in the video are Nathan Rooney, Melissa Hendrickson, and BLM Outdoor Recreation Planner, Jason West. Video by Jason West using Go-Pro Hero 2.
Views: 3838 BLMNational
Find Yourself On Public Land
 
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"Sometimes, you find yourself in the middle of nowhere, and sometimes, in the middle of nowhere, you find yourself." —Author Unknown Learn more about your public lands at http://mypubliclands.tumblr.com/
Views: 866 BLMNational
The BLM's Wild Horse and Burro Program
 
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The BLM discusses management of wild horses and burros on the public lands.
Views: 17493 BLMNational
BLM Principal Deputy Director Visits BLM Public Lands in Arizona
 
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Bureau of Land Management Principal Deputy Director Neil Kornze visited the BLM's Arizona State Office February 2014 where he presented retired employee Scott Florence with the 2013 Director's Award for Excellence in Leadership. Kornze also toured BLM Arizona lands to see first-hand the BLM's successful response to border-related activities and the accomplishments of BLM Arizona employees and partners on the ground.
Views: 511 BLMNational