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This incredible animation shows how deep the ocean really is
 
03:30
Just how deep does the ocean go? Way further than you think. This animation puts the actual distance into perspective, showing a vast distance between the waves we see and the mysterious point we call Challenger Deep. Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/sai FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/techinsider TWITTER: https://twitter.com/techinsider INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/businessinsider/ TUMBLR: http://businessinsider.tumblr.com/
Views: 22187322 Tech Insider
Google's DeepMind AI Just Taught Itself To Walk
 
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Google's artificial intelligence company, DeepMind, has developed an AI that has managed to learn how to walk, run, jump, and climb without any prior guidance. The result is as impressive as it is goofy. Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/sai FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/techinsider TWITTER: https://twitter.com/techinsider INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/businessinsider/ TUMBLR: http://businessinsider.tumblr.com/
Views: 5293299 Tech Insider
7-minute workout routine
 
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Researchers at the Human Performance Institute in Orlando, FL, found that a high-intensity circuit training (HICT) routine is the most effective way to workout. This program uses a series of 12 exercises done over the course of approximately 7 minutes. Michael Bultman of CrossFit NYC performs the circuit for you to follow along at home. Produced by Kevin Reilly. Additional camera by Maya Dangerfield. Animations by Gene Kim. Special thanks to Michael Bultman and CrossFit NYC. Read more: http://www.techinsider.io/ FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/techinsider TWITTER: https://twitter.com/techinsider INSTAGRAM: https://instagram.com/tech_insider/ TUMBLR: http://techinsider.tumblr.com/
Views: 613743 Tech Insider
Why NASA won't send humans to Venus
 
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Although Venus is easier to reach than Mars, scientists and space agencies around the world show little interest in exploring the planet. Why is it that they have so much enthusiasm in examining Mars but not our neighboring planet, Venus? Read more: http://www.techinsider.io/ FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/techinsider TWITTER: https://twitter.com/businessinsider INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/businessinsider/ TUMBLR: http://businessinsider.tumblr.com/
Views: 2817346 Tech Insider
Watch Elon Musk reveal SpaceX's most detailed plans to colonize Mars
 
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Elon Musk wants to build a metropolis on Mars starting in 2024. Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/sai FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/techinsider TWITTER: https://twitter.com/techinsider INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/tech_insider/
Views: 1108521 Tech Insider
An artist spent 6 months creating a fake grocery store completely made of felt
 
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There's a new grocery store in New York, but don't try to eat any of the food inside. "8 'Till Late" is an art installation from British artist Lucy Sparrow that sells products you would typically find in an NYC bodega, except everything is made out of felt. It's perfect for Instagramming, and yes, there's even a bodega cat. Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/sai FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/techinsider TWITTER: https://twitter.com/techinsider INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/businessinsider/ TUMBLR: http://businessinsider.tumblr.com/
Views: 3778034 Tech Insider
How to survive a fall through frozen ice
 
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The winter season turns the outdoors into a frosty wonderland. But if you venture too far out onto that beautiful mirror-like frozen lake, it may crack apart beneath your feet. We hope it won't but, if it does, here's what to do. Read more: http://www.techinsider.io/ FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/techinsider TWITTER: https://twitter.com/businessinsider INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/businessinsider/ TUMBLR: http://businessinsider.tumblr.com/
Views: 1285040 Tech Insider
What losing weight does to your body and brain
 
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Special thanks to John Gunstad, professor with the Department of Psychological Sciences at Kent State University, for speaking with us about his cutting-edge research on how losing weight affects brain function. Following is a transcript of the video. Here’s what losing weight does to your body and brain. During the first week, you may find it easy to lose weight by simply switching to a healthier diet. But as your metabolism adjusts, you won’t burn as many calories as you used to. So losing additional weight will become harder. Making matters worse, as the fat melts away, you’ll start to experience an increase in appetite. After a meal, fat cells release a hormone called leptin into the bloodstream. This surge in leptin levels signals to your brain you’re full and should stop eating. But with less overall fat, people who lose weight show a measurable dip in leptin. Brain scans of obese patients who had lost 10% of their body weight revealed that less leptin leads to increased activity in regions of the brain that control our desire to eat. The result isn’t just an increased appetite but an even stronger urge to eat fatty, high-calorie foods, because your brain is trying to restore the body’s leptin levels to normal. However, fighting that early impulse to gorge on pizza and donuts is worth it in the long run. Besides the decreased risk of heart disease, hypertension, high cholesterol and type 2 diabetes, scientists studying overweight people discovered that losing just one pound of body weight reduces four pounds of pressure on knee joints. Losing excess weight also reduces strain on the blood vessels, increases blood flow to the brain, and boosts overall brain function. Several studies have shown that people who underwent weight-loss surgery saw an improvement in memory, concentration, and problem-solving skills in as soon as three months. Plus, brain scans indicate that people who lost weight and kept it off for nine months reacted differently when shown images of high-calorie foods than before they lost the weight. The brain regions that process reward, motivation, and taste didn’t react as strongly, whereas the areas that promote overall self-control had a boost in activity. So fighting those cravings early on might make them easier to control later. Turns out — like anything else — losing weight can get easier with practice. Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/sai FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/techinsider TWITTER: https://twitter.com/techinsider INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/tech_insider/
Views: 1534996 Tech Insider
This incredible animation shows how deep humans have dug
 
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If we were to journey to the center of the Earth, it would take a lot longer than you might expect. Here's how deep humans have dug underground. Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/sai FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/techinsider TWITTER: https://twitter.com/techinsider INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/tech_insider/
Views: 2207189 Tech Insider
Einstein's unique way of thinking contributed to his genius
 
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Robbert Dijkgraaf is a theoretical physicist and Leon Levy Professor at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton. He is also the co-author of "The Usefulness of Useless Knowledge." In this video, he explains how Albert Einstein saw the world in a different way from how most scientists see it. Following is a transcript of the video. Einstein was a true genius and it’s the example that we all aspire to be as a scientist. But already as a child he had a very original way of thinking. So from the very beginning, for Einstein, his imagination was crucial. He was not such a good student because he was a very original thinker. And I think that was, kind of, the magic touch that he had. He always had a completely original point of view. He somehow didn’t conform to the existing theories, and he was always thinking in his own particular way. His favorite way to operate as a scientist was the thought experiment. And he describes for instance, the crucial moment, where he essentially discovered the theory of general relativity. He was watching workers on the roof of a building and suddenly thought whoa what would happen if they fell down. And then he realized, if you fall down, you no longer experience gravity. And that, in some sense, that’s the natural motion and that actual led him to derive the theory of general relativity and described that moment as the happiest moment in his life. And later he said something that I actually find personally very comforting: Is that imagination is much more important than knowledge because knowledge describes what we know. Imagination is describing everything that we can potentially know in the future. Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/sai FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/techinsider TWITTER: https://twitter.com/techinsider INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/businessinsider/ TUMBLR: http://businessinsider.tumblr.com/
Views: 749616 Tech Insider
The 5 deadliest volcanic eruptions in human history
 
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Earth harbors hundreds of active volcanoes. When they erupt, they can change the climate of the entire planet. Indeed, they are one of Mother Nature's deadliest phenomena. Here, we've ranked the deadliest eruptions in history. Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/sai FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/techinsider TWITTER: https://twitter.com/techinsider INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/businessinsider/ TUMBLR: http://businessinsider.tumblr.com/
Views: 907310 Tech Insider
Animation shows the deadly evolution of nuclear weapons
 
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It's been decades since the United States dropped the first atomic bomb. Since then, the exponential increase of the destructive power of nuclear weapons is almost unimaginable. Here's how powerful nuclear weapons have become. Read more: http://www.techinsider.io/ FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/techinsider TWITTER: https://twitter.com/businessinsider INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/businessinsider/ TUMBLR: http://businessinsider.tumblr.com/
Views: 804336 Tech Insider
A hacker explains the best way to browse the internet anonymously
 
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While it may seem difficult these days to remain anonymous online, it's not impossible. We spoke with Kevin Mitnick, author of "The Art of Invisibility," who told us the one tool you should be using if you want to protect your identity. Read more: http://www.techinsider.io/ FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/techinsider TWITTER: https://twitter.com/businessinsider INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/businessinsider/ TUMBLR: http://businessinsider.tumblr.com/
Views: 1508303 Tech Insider
Most hurricanes that hit the US come from the same exact spot in the world
 
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As Hurricane Irma bears down on the East coast, Floridians may be wondering where all the hurricanes come from, and why they all follow a similar course. In fact, Irma, Harvey, and Jose were all born on the other side of the Atlantic, off the coast of Africa, and the Sahara desert may be to blame. Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/sai FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/techinsider TWITTER: https://twitter.com/techinsider INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/tech_insider/
Views: 661511 Tech Insider
What Happens To Your Body And Brain If You Don't Get Sleep
 
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Sleep expert Matthew Walker breaks down the many effects of sleep deprivation on your brain and body. Following is a transcript of the video. Matthew Walker: My name is Matthew Walker, I am a professor of neuroscience and psychology at the University of California, Berkeley, and I am the author of the book "Why We Sleep." We certainly know that a lack of sleep will actually prevent your brain from being able to initially make new memories, so it's almost as though without sleep the memory inbox of the brain shuts down and you can't commit new experiences to memory. So those new incoming informational emails are just bounced, and you end up feeling as though you're amnesiac. You can't essentially make and create those new memories. We also know that a lack of sleep will lead to an increased development of a toxic protein in the brain that is called beta amyloid and that is associated with Alzheimer's disease because it is during deep sleep at night when a sewage system within the brain actually kicks in to high gear and it starts to wash away this toxic protein, beta amyloid. So if you're not getting enough sleep each and every night, more of that Alzheimer's-related protein will build up. The more protein that builds up, the greater your risk of going on to develop dementia in later life. What are the effects of sleep deprivation on the body? Well, there are many different effects. Firstly, we know that sleep deprivation affects the reproductive system. We know that men who are sleeping just five to six hours a night have a level of testosterone which is that of someone ten years their senior. So a lack of sleep will age you by almost a decade in terms of that aspect of virility and wellness. We also know that a lack of sleep impacts your immune system. So after just one night of four to five hours of sleep, there is a 70% reduction in critical anticancer-fighting immune cells called natural killer cells. And that's the reason that we know that short sleep duration predicts your risk for developing numerous forms of cancer. And that list currently includes cancer of the bowel, cancer of the prostate, as well as cancer of the breast. In fact, the link between a lack of sleep and cancer is now so strong that recently the World Health Organization decided to classify any form of nighttime shift work as a probable carcinogen. So in other words, jobs that may induce cancer because of a disruption of your sleep rate rhythms. We also know that a lack of sleep impacts your cardiovascular system because it is during deep sleep at night that you receive this most wonderful form of effectively blood pressure medication. Your heart rate drops, your blood pressure goes down. If you're not getting sufficient sleep, you're not getting that reboot of the cardiovascular system, so your blood pressure rises. You have, if you're getting six hours of sleep or less, a 200% increased risk of having a fatal heart attack or stroke in your lifetime. There is a global experiment that is performed on 1.6 billion people twice a year and it's called daylight saving time. And we know that in the spring, when we lose one hour of sleep, we see a subsequent 24% increase in heart attacks the following day. Another question, perhaps, is what is the recycle rate of a human being? How long can we actually last without sleep before we start to see declines in your brain function or even impairments within your body? And the answer seems to be about 16 hours of wakefulness. Once you get past 16 hours of being awake, that's when we start to see mental deterioration and physiological deterioration in the body. We know that after you've been awake for 19 or 20 hours, your mental capacity is so impaired that you would be as deficient as someone who was legally drunk behind the wheel of a car. So if you were to ask me what is the recycle rate of a human being, it does seem to be about 16 hours and we need about eight hours of sleep to repair the damage of wakefulness. Wakefulness essentially is low-level brain damage. Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/sai FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/techinsider TWITTER: https://twitter.com/techinsider INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/tech_insider/
Views: 1617091 Tech Insider
An exercise scientist explains the proper way to do a push-up
 
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Shawn Arent, the director of the Center for Health and Human Performance at Rutgers University and a Fellow of the American College of Sports Medicine, demonstrates the proper form for the push-up. Special thanks to David Sanders. Following is a transcript of the video. They’re easy to do when you have no equipment and you can work the chest, the shoulders and the triceps along with this. From a starting position, one of the things you’ll notice is Dave is going to have his hands set just outside of his shoulders. Elbows are pointing back slightly and his body is already in a straight and he’s all the way down. And you notice at this point his head is in a neutral position, his neck is flat, his back is flat, and his weight is between his hands and the balls of his feet. When Dave lowers himself down he’s going to keep his elbows slightly back towards himself. And as he pushes himself back up, he’s going to prevent them from flaring out. What we don’t want him to do is flare his elbows out One of the things we want to avoid as well is dropping his head. When doing this, you wind up rounding your spine and getting improper technique this way too and you’re not putting optimal pressure on the chest in order to do the movement. The other thing too with a proper push-up is you don’t want to wind up in a pike position where his butt is up in the air. But you also don’t want to wind up where your hips are sagging as you come down too. To do a proper push-up, touch yourself all the way to the floor, then push back up. If you have a hard time doing a full push-up, what he can actually do is do this from his knees. All you’re going to do is put the weight on your knees, as well as your hands at this point. Same motion with the upper body, keeping the spine flat, head up in a neutral position. Press all the way down and then all the way up. Another variation on the push-up to make it slightly easier, would be to put your hands on the bench in order to do it as well. We want to keep a neutral spine, head up, and when he pushes down, lower himself press back up to a full extension and he’s keeping himself completely flat in through the spine as well. An alternative when using the bench is instead of making the push-up easier is to actually make it harder. In this case, you’ll put your feet up on the bench in order to do the push-up now. Again with his spine in a nice neutral position, lowering all the way down to the ground. Keeps his back flat. Keeps his hips from sagging. And that’s what a push-up would look like with your feet up on the bench to actually make it harder, instead of easier. Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/sai FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/techinsider TWITTER: https://twitter.com/techinsider INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/businessinsider/ TUMBLR: http://businessinsider.tumblr.com/
Views: 350385 Tech Insider
Here's how to find water if you're ever stuck in the desert
 
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If you ever find yourself lost in the desert, knowing how to quickly find water is going to be key to for your survival. Here's what you're going to need to know. The following is a transcript of the video: The human body can survive for about 3 days without water, which can be extremely hard to find in hot desert climates. Look for signs of life if you can't find a water source. Vegetation, birds, and insects can all mean a nearby water source. Fruits, vegetables, cacti, and roots all contain water and mashing them with a rock will release some liquid. Water flows down, so check low terrain. Canyons and mountain bases could be home to a water source. Morning dew can be collected with a cloth and then wrung out into your mouth.Just make sure you collect it before sunrise or it will evaporate before you can get it. Use cups or any other container to catch rainfall. If possible, build a water-catching tarp. This will allow even more water to be collected. Look for damp ground, vegetation, and dry river beds. These things can all indicate underground water. If you dig a hole a few feet deep nearby, it's likely water will seep in. If possible, always filter the water. But if you have to choose between dehydration and unfiltered water — take your chances with the water. Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/sai FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/techinsider TWITTER: https://twitter.com/techinsider INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/businessinsider/ TUMBLR: http://businessinsider.tumblr.com/
Views: 2831292 Tech Insider
String Theory Explained
 
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Renowned theoretical physicist, Brian Greene, explains string theory as if he's talking to a graduate student of physics and then he boils it down for the rest of us. Greene is the co-founder of the World Science Festival, which has a new initiative called "City of Science" which is a 5-event series taking place this fall. "City of Science" is free and open to all New Yorkers of all ages. Learn more about where and when it will take place here. You can also follow the events on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. Read more: http://www.techinsider.io/ FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/techinsider TWITTER: https://twitter.com/businessinsider INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/businessinsider/ TUMBLR: http://businessinsider.tumblr.com/
Views: 252951 Tech Insider
Why Is Caviar So Expensive?
 
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Caviar is one of the most expensive foods in the world. Selling for up to $35,000 per kilo, it's revered and relished by aristocrats across the globe. But it's an acquired taste. Turns out, caviar wasn't always so valuable. In the 19th century, sturgeon species in the US were so common that there are accounts of caviar being offered in saloons for free, like bar nuts. In Europe, fishermen were feeding the eggs to their pigs, or leaving it on the beach to spoil. What changed? Similar to true champagne, caviar doesn't come from just anywhere. This, for example, is not caviar. To get the real thing, it has to be eggs from a sturgeon. There are 27 species around the world in North America, Europe, and Asia. But probably not for long.  Arne Ludwig: In this case, sturgeon will die out because humans are over-harvesting their populations and destroying their habitats. In 2010, the International Union for Conservation of Nature placed 18 species on its Red List of Threatened Species, making the sturgeon the most endangered group of species on Earth. But lists like these are bittersweet. On the one hand, they can help protect the sturgeon from further population decline. On the other hand, the rarer that caviar becomes, the more we can't get enough of it. There's actually an economic idea that explains this. It's called the rarity value thesis and it describes how "rarity increases the value of the item." Sturgeon can weigh up to several thousand pounds, and produce hundreds of pounds of roe at a time. The world record belongs to a beluga sturgeon that weighed 2,520 pounds and yielded 900 pounds of roe. Today, she'd be worth about half a million dollars.  It wasn't until around the 20th century when these freshwater fish and their eggs became a rare commodity. Pollution poisoned their waters and dams blocked their spawning grounds upstream. They had nowhere to reproduce and continued to be overfished for their meat and roe. On top of that, it takes 8-20 years for a female to sexually mature, depending on the species. She can produce millions of eggs at a time, but odds are that only one will survive to adulthood. In the end, the sturgeon population couldn't keep up with demand and their coveted eggs became the jewels of the luxury food scene. Today, caviar imports and exports are closely regulated in the US., which is partly why it's so expensive.  Deborah Keane: People forget that every single egg, every one of these eggs is taken off by hand. Now, remember that we're dealing with a raw seafood endangered species. So it is basically like eating and dealing with edible elephant tusks. It is that heavily regulated. That's why today, the majority of caviar comes from sturgeon farms. Deborah Keane: Little did I know that by 2011, all wild caviar would become illegal on the planet. When I started there were six farms in the world and only two producing caviar in the world and that was in 2004. Now, there are 2,000 farms. One farm, in particular, in China called Kaluga Queen produces 35% of the world's caviar. Caviar there is harvested with the classic Russian and Iranian technique, which involves killing the fish and then extracting the eggs. Other farms are exploring a different technique, which doesn't involve killing the fish. It's called stripping. The fish are injected with a hormone that triggers their urge to release eggs. Farmers have been doing this for many years, but not to get caviar — just to produce more fish. It wasn't until recently that people started canning this stuff and selling it as caviar. Dmitrijs Tracuks: The biggest thing is that yes, fish stays alive. You have really small impact on the fish because you do it really fast. You take the fish out of the water, you put it on the special holding facility. The fish has already started to spawn and so all that requires is to press on the belly, massage the belly and the caviar will just flow out of the fish. The idea behind no-kill caviar is a commendable one, but it has yet to catch on. Either way, with caviar farms in place, this gives the wild sturgeon population a chance to recover. But whether or not, that happens is largely up to us. Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/sai FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/techinsider TWITTER: https://twitter.com/techinsider INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/tech_insider/
Views: 941320 Tech Insider
Neil deGrasse Tyson on universe misconceptions
 
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Neil deGrasse Tyson explains some of the biggest misconceptions we have about the universe. Produced by Darren Weaver and Kamelia Angelova. Additional production by Kevin Reilly and Rob Ludacer. Read more: http://www.techinsider.io/ FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/techinsider TWITTER: https://twitter.com/techinsider INSTAGRAM: https://instagram.com/tech_insider/ TUMBLR: http://techinsider.tumblr.com/
Views: 147675 Tech Insider
Why your phone battery gets worse with time
 
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No matter what type of phone you have, if it's around 2-3 years old then you're probably starting to run into some battery issues. So why is that? Well, it all has to do with the chemical reactions inside your phone. Here's what you need to know. Read more: http://www.techinsider.io/ FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/techinsider TWITTER: https://twitter.com/businessinsider INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/businessinsider/ TUMBLR: http://businessinsider.tumblr.com/
Views: 470028 Tech Insider
Deepest swimming pool in the world
 
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Y-40 The Deep Joy is the kind of pool that scuba and free divers dream of. It holds a Guinness World Record as the deepest pool for diving at 137 feet. It also has various features for divers of all levels to practice their skills. Read more: http://www.techinsider.io/ FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/techinsider TWITTER: https://twitter.com/techinsider INSTAGRAM: https://instagram.com/tech_insider/ TUMBLR: http://techinsider.tumblr.com/
Views: 2034132 Tech Insider
What a baby sees during its first year
 
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Babies see the world differently. A child's vision doesn't fully mature until they're two years old. But the biggest changes happen within the first year. Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/sai FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/techinsider TWITTER: https://twitter.com/techinsider INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/tech_insider/
Views: 630140 Tech Insider
How Intermittent Fasting Affects Your Body and Brain
 
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Stars like Beyonce and Hugh Jackman have spoken out about following intermittent fasting plans to get in shape. How does intermittent fasting work? Here's what actually happens to your body and brain when you fast. Following is a transcript of the video. How long has it been since you last ate? People who fast intermittently often eat within an 8-hour block, leaving 16 hours of fasting in between. During that 16-hour stretch, their bodies undergo an important change that sets them apart from non-fasters. Here's how it works. When you eat, you store some of that energy in the liver as glycogen. But after 10-12 hours of not eating, your glycogen reserves will be extremely low. As a result, you may feel more irritable than normal, a term scientists call "hangry." The upside is — with little glycogen left — fat cells in your body release fats into your bloodstream. The fat cells head straight to your liver, where they're converted to energy for your body and brain. So, you are literally burning fat to survive. Blood samples show that people who had fasted for 12-24 hours experienced a 60% increase in energy from fat, with the biggest change occurring after 18 hours. This is the benefit to intermittent fasting because it puts you in a state called ketosis. And it's why researchers think intermittent fasting could be the key to a longer, healthier life. The process of burning fat releases chemicals called ketones. In the brain, ketones trigger the release of an important molecule called BDNF. BDNF helps build and strengthen neurons and neural connections in areas of the brain responsible for learning and memory. Which could explain why a boost in ketone production has been shown to improve memory in people with early signs of dementia in as soon as 6 weeks. Increasing ketones in the body is also a common treatment for patients with severe epilepsy. You don't necessarily have to fast to boost your ketone levels. Introducing more fatty foods into your diet and cutting back on carbs can have a similar effect. A group of people who tried this method for 3 months not only lost weight and body fat, but also saw a decrease in blood pressure and a hormone (IGF-1) that is related to aging and disease. But scientists have discovered that fasting increases ketone levels more. Ketogenic diets can increase ketones 4-fold whereas fasting has been shown to increase ketones by up to 20-fold. As a result, fasting — compared to a ketogenic diet — may have a stronger, more beneficial effect on overall health. Yet many Americans who eat three meals a day with snacks in between never reach ketosis, and therefore aren't producing enough ketones to promote good health. Fasting and ketosis have been a key to our survival from the beginning. They helped our ancient ancestors survive through bouts of starvation. And today, they're becoming recognized as a way to help keep future generations mentally and physically disease-free. Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/sai FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/techinsider TWITTER: https://twitter.com/techinsider INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/tech_insider/
Views: 356689 Tech Insider
What happens if you stop eating sugar
 
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According to dietitian Tamara Duker Freuman, MS, RD, CDN, when we cut out sugar out of our diets we can expect some immediate physical changes. Produced by Maya Dangerfield. Camera by Grace Raver. Special thanks to Tamara Duker Freuman. Read more: http://www.techinsider.io/ FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/techinsider TWITTER: https://twitter.com/techinsider INSTAGRAM: https://instagram.com/tech_insider/ TUMBLR: http://techinsider.tumblr.com/
Views: 1461649 Tech Insider
If the Earth stopped spinning
 
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The Earth spins at more than 1000 mph. If it were to suddenly stop, the effects would be disastrous. Produced by Kevin Reilly. Animation by Rob Ludacer Read more: http://www.techinsider.io/ FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/techinsider TWITTER: https://twitter.com/techinsider INSTAGRAM: https://instagram.com/tech_insider/ TUMBLR: http://techinsider.tumblr.com/
Views: 2496510 Tech Insider
How eating spicy food affects your brain and body
 
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What happens to your brain & body when you eat spicy food. Hot peppers trick your brain into thinking your mouth is on fire. But there's no real heat in a pepper. So, what's going on? It's all about a chemical compound in peppers called capsaicin. Capsaicin binds to pain receptors on our nerves called TRPV1. Normally, it reacts to heat by sending warning signals to the brain. Capsaicin causes TRPV1 to send those same signals. So, you react as if there's something hot in your mouth. Your body tries to cool itself off. So, you start to sweat and your face turns red. At the same time, your eyes tear up and nose runs. This is your body's way of removing the "threat". After swallowing, the capsaicin binds to more receptors on its way down. In severe cases, you may develop blisters in the throat, vomit, and even go into anaphylactic shock. So, why do so many people enjoy spicy food? In response to the pain, your brain releases endorphins and dopamine. Combined, these chemicals create euphoria similar to "runner's high". Ultimately, your response to spicy food depends on your tolerance. So, if you're the type who cries over a jalapeño, don't sweat too much. You can build up a tolerance over time with practice. Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/sai FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/techinsider TWITTER: https://twitter.com/techinsider INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/tech_insider/
Views: 210625 Tech Insider
Scientists grow lamb fetus inside artificial womb
 
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Researchers at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) have created an artificial womb. Inside of the womb, they placed a premature lamb fetus. They then kept the fetus in the womb for four weeks. The big question was: Would the lamb fetus survive? Turns out, it didn't just survive, it thrived. Over its four weeks in the artificial womb, the lamb started to grow a wool coat, gained weight, and even opened its eyes. The researchers successfully tested eight lamb fetuses this way. But growing lamb fetuses is just the beginning. Ultimately, the researchers are working toward creating an artificial womb that could sustain premature human babies. Preemies haven't had time to fully develop in the womb and, therefore, are at a higher risk of health problems throughout their life. If doctors could place a preemie inside of an artificial womb where it could spend its remaining weeks fully developing, this could completely change that baby's life. The researchers emphasized that future artificial wombs for humans could only sustain babies born after 23 weeks in the womb. So, the mother's womb is still essential for conception and early-stage development. Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/sai FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/techinsider TWITTER: https://twitter.com/techinsider INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/businessinsider/ TUMBLR: http://businessinsider.tumblr.com/
Views: 1285269 Tech Insider
I Quit Social Media For 1 Month — And It Was The Best Choice I Ever Made
 
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I quit social media for a month. So, I quit Facebook, Instagram, Snapchat, and Twitter. I just needed a break. It was time to cut myself off I stopped using social media this morning and my brain is going crazy. I just realized how often I glance down just to see if I have a notification. When I wake up in the morning, on the way to work, on the train, walking from the train to work, sometimes at work —  sorry — when I get home from work. It's constant. I watched a TED Talk by Doctor Cal Newport and he said going on social media is like going to the casino. You're anticipating getting likes and you come out of it. You go back in thinking, “I’ll get the reward next time. I’ll get the reward next time. I’ll get the reward next time.” And you just sit around waiting for a notification to come around so you can go back. I think I'm probably not the only person in my generation who feels this way. I have friends who use Facebook to promote their music shows and send invites for birthday parties. It's a very big part of my social life and that might be something I'm missing. I'm hoping with this social media fast that my brain will kind of recalibrate itself — go back to my life pre-social media. I hope to become more focused, more productive, for my brain to be a little less scattered and all over the place. I really hope I inspire other people to do this because as an avid social media user, I'd like to prove that we don't need it. Here’s how it went. The first day of my social media cleanse was a Friday so I was at work and I wasn't — shouldn't have been on my phone anyway. I woke up on Saturday to go to brunch with my friend. She was an hour late and I had nothing to distract myself. Day two, my solution for being social media free was “let's text every person I know because I'm so bored.” And then once I got back to work it got a little easier. Coworkers were trying to get me to watch videos on Twitter. Within the first week, I was cured of my addictive thumb swiping and checking my phone. The verdict: I wake up feeling way more rested. I spend 9 hours a day staring at a screen at my job and cutting down on screen time outside of the office has changed my world. I don't have as many headaches, I don't feel tired all the time. It just makes so much sense. As the experiment went on, I started to feel like there were extra hours in the day, like I was given this gift of reading time and cooking time and exercise time. I realized that once I'm tired, I just surrender. I just go to bed. It’s like whatever. I don't need to sit there and be like: must stay awake. Must consume content. It’s like no! Just go to bed, you freak! This experiment has revolutionized my productivity at work. If you had checked in with me before this experiment I would have 30 tabs open doing random research and tweeting and checking Slack.  I was a productivity nightmare. My well-being has improved tenfold. My mind has never been so clear. I feel like I'm learning how to properly communicate in a world without social media. I’ve been given more time with my thoughts. I know a lot of people who will mind-numbingly scroll instead of just sitting with their thoughts and dealing with their emotions and all the things that have happened in their day and their week and their month. We’ve got to focus on ourselves for a little bit and not every random stranger you’re friends with on Facebook. I learned that "FOMO" isn't real if you don't know what you're missing out on. If there was a party that I missed, I don't know about it so I don't care! I'm not seeing people's Instagrams from it and I'm not seeing Snapchat videos and I'm not feeling like I missed out on anything because I'm not seeing it. I would urge you to delete one social media app from your phone. See if you miss it. See if it changes your life. See if you notice how much time you had been spending on that app. I was really scared of quitting social media at first. I thought I would miss out on a ton of things. It actually turned out to be the best choice I’ve ever made and I really encourage you to do the same. Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/sai FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/techinsider TWITTER: https://twitter.com/techinsider INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/tech_insider/
Views: 120012 Tech Insider
Former iPhone factory worker explains how they keep the new iPhones a secret
 
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While the US media scrambles to find out any minor details about future iPhone models, workers in China already know a lot about the device. Dejian Zeng, an NYU grad student who spent 6 weeks working undercover in a Pegatron iPhone factory in Shanghai, explains what the factory would do to prevent leaks as they transitioned into working on the iPhone 7. Following is a transcript of the video: "It’s impossible for workers to take photos or even carry some components out." Dejian Zeng spent 6 weeks working at a Pegatron iPhone factory in China. Here’s how they kept the iPhone 7 a secret. "Workers know how popular the iPhone is in China. And typically when we started producing the iPhone 7, a lot of workers think it’s very cool that they see the products that have not yet been published. In the workshop, we were originally producing the iPhone 6s, and during that time that we were in the workshop, they were already building up some facilities or infrastructure to build the assembly line for iPhone 7. And they had this big curtain that blocked everything. So even though we were in the same workshop, we saw nothing. And later on, we were moved to another sub-factory building to do work there for a while, because they need to rebuild the assembly line that we are working on also. After a while, we were moved back to the factory, and we had the new assembly line producing iPhone 7. We have a locker room. That’s where workers changed their clothes, put their phones, their keys, all their metals. We need to swipe our card, and they have facial recognition. After you get in, you wait in line to go through a metal detector. But that was during the time that I was producing iPhone 6s. When I was producing iPhone 7, they increased their security level. There were two metal detectors in the factories, and they also increased the sensitivity of it. Like, for example, some girls have some bras that have metals in it. All of a sudden, on that specific day, they couldn’t pass the security door, and they needed to go back and change everything. Inside the factories, any kind of metal is not allowed. So I don’t think anybody can bring a camera or something like that inside of the factories. But high-level managers — they’re able to bring their phone. So I’m not sure whether photos can get leaked by that. But every time when they need to go through the metal detectors, the security will ask those managers to press the button on their phone, so that they can see the screen. Because I think there are some cases where they bring an iPhone and put it in a case of a fake phone and just carried it out. A lot of the workers, on the first day they start producing it, we can tell that there’s no headphone jack there. And then we can see that they have two cameras. So those are some things that we can see and we can remember and we can tell the media later on. There are cameras in the workshop, in every assembly line. During the training, they told us that there are some cases where workers were trying to carry iPhones out of the factories and got caught, and they were being sent to the police. So when I was producing iPhone 6, I did see Apple come for audits. I think it was 2 or 3 times. And every time when they come, the manger in the factories got very nervous. They would tell us you need to follow the procedure and sit straight, and don’t talk. Later on, when we started producing iPhone 7, you could see Apple staff there every single day." Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/sai FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/techinsider TWITTER: https://twitter.com/techinsider INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/businessinsider/ TUMBLR: http://businessinsider.tumblr.com/
Views: 1584792 Tech Insider
How Lucid Dreaming Works
 
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You may have heard of lucid dreaming, the type of dream where the dreamer is aware of dreaming. Is lucid dreaming a real phenomenon? Sleep expert Matthew Walker explains how much we know about lucid dreams so far. Following is a transcript of the video. Jessica Orwig: What if we could control our dreams? When most of us dream, our thoughts and actions are involuntary. The dream plays out as if we were watching a movie. But not all dreams are the same. There is another kind of dreaming called lucid dreaming, which is more like playing a video game than watching a movie. Matthew Walker: By definition lucid dreaming is simply the act of knowing that you're dreaming whilst you're dreaming. My name is Matthew Walker. I am a professor of neuroscience and psychology at the University of California Berkeley. Most people actually think of lucid dreaming more in the sense of actually beginning to control what you're dreaming. So, you gain volitional control and you decide what's going to happen during your dream. Orwig: Frequent lucid dreamers claim that they can control many parts of the dream such as teleporting themselves to another location, learning to improve real-life skills, or even eating fire. It might sound far-fetched. And until recently we lacked the technology to prove if lucid dreaming was real or not. But a series of recent studies has shed light on the phenomenon. Walker: Scientists have designed experiments and they’ve been able to demonstrate objectively that when people say that they're doing something in that dream that they actually are. Orwig: In 2012, scientists reported results from one of the first experiments that objectively measured lucid dreams using fMRI scanners.  fMRIs measure the rate of blood flow to different areas of the brain, so they can relay information about a person's thoughts and actions simply through a series of images. For the study, scientists first asked participants to clench their fists while they were awake. This lit up key areas of the brain on the fMRI scanner. After that, participants were asked to fall asleep and dream about clenching their fists. Sure enough — similar regions of the brain lit up in both cases. Lucid dreaming comes naturally to some, but many of us have never experienced the sensation. However, that doesn’t mean it’s impossible. Walker: How can we actually become more capable of lucid dreaming? Well, it's a little bit tricky, but you can certainly try to tell yourself that you will remember that you're dreaming whilst you're dreaming before you actually fall asleep. So, try to go through a mantra chant as it were. Some people actually try to do deliberative things whilst sleeping, like turning on the lights in a room. And that helps them to become aware that they are dreaming at the moment of dreaming itself and therefore they gain lucid control. Orwig: Those who can already control their dreams with ease say lucid dreams aren’t only for entertainment but can also be used to expand one's conscious boundaries. On the other hand, lucid dreamers have also reported frightening accounts where they have trouble distinguishing reality from the dream. In some cases, this can be a sign of mental illness, and should be taken seriously. But why do some people have the ability to lucid dream but not others? And what is happening in our subconscious that triggers the experience? There’s still a lot we have to learn about the causes and effects of lucid dreaming. Walker: It seems to be only around 20 to 30% of the population are actually natural lucid dreamers. So, perhaps if it was so beneficial mother nature would have had all of us being table of lucid dreaming. And the fact that we’re not perhaps means that it's not necessarily beneficial. But we actually don’t know. Maybe those 20 to 30% of people who do lucid dream are at the forefront of hominid evolution, and they are going to be the next species of preference. We just don't know. Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/sai FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/techinsider TWITTER: https://twitter.com/techinsider INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/tech_insider/
Views: 104915 Tech Insider
Why SpaceX can't hire non-US citizens
 
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While unveiling how SpaceX was planning on getting humans to Mars, an audience member asked CEO Elon Musk why they don't hire international workers. Here's what he said. Read more: http://www.techinsider.io/ FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/techinsider TWITTER: https://twitter.com/businessinsider INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/businessinsider/ TUMBLR: http://businessinsider.tumblr.com/
Views: 117113 Tech Insider
How to remember everything you learn
 
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How many times have you thought you could remember something and end up entirely forgetting what it was? This isn't uncommon behavior, and you could improve your memory by training and adopting certain techniques. Read more: http://www.techinsider.io/ FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/techinsider TWITTER: https://twitter.com/businessinsider INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/businessinsider/ TUMBLR: http://businessinsider.tumblr.com/
Views: 360076 Tech Insider
What Happens To Your Body When You Start Exercising Regularly
 
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Leading a more active lifestyle takes time, effort, and determination, but in the end, it's really worth the shot. Here's what will happen to your body when you exercise regularly. Following is a transcript of the video. If you're thinking about leading a more active lifestyle, you're not alone. In recent years, an increasing number of Americans have started participating in more sports, fitness, and recreation. Whether you're trying to get fit or build muscle, or you're just tired of the couch, here are some changes you can expect along the way. What happens to your body when you start exercising regularly? During that first workout, you might feel more alert and energized because ramping up your heart rate means a boost in overall blood flow and oxygen to the brain. But prepare yourself for the day after, when you'll almost certainly get a case of DOMS, short for delayed onset muscle soreness. The soreness will persist for about 72 hours, but the good news is you're less likely to get it again as long as you continue to regularly exercise those same muscles. Over the next few weeks you'll slowly start to ramp up production of mitochondria via a process called mitochondrial biogenesis. Mitochondria are the parts of your cells that convert carbs, fat, and protein into fuel that your muscles use to do their job, like flex and contract. After six to eight weeks, studies have shown that people can increase their mitochondria by up to 50%. With more mitochondria in your cells, you'll start to feel more fit, and your endurance will increase. So running three miles will no longer feel as difficult as it did during that first week. Once you're six months in, all that hard work should finally start to show. If your workouts focus on strength training, you'll notice your muscles begin to take shape. You're also less likely to fall off the workout wagon at this point. Exercise programs often see a 50% dropout rate within the first six months, but after that more people stick with it. Now, if you're more focused on cardio, then by nine months of regular exercise you should see about a 25% increase in your VO2 max. VO2 max is often used as a measure of fitness and refers to the rate your body can transport oxygen to your muscles for fuel. Basically, higher VO2 max means you can run faster for longer. So a 25% increase in VO2 max, for example, means you can run about 20% farther in the same amount of time. After one year of regular exercise, your bones will be denser, which reduces your risk of osteoporosis. In fact, researchers have found that regular resistance training, when combined with aerobic exercise, can actually reverse the effects of osteoporosis after 12 months. Now, if you maintain your exercise program long term, your body might not be the only thing to benefit. Your bank account may also beef up a bit. One study revealed that older people who exercised five days a week for at least 30 minutes saved, on average, $2,500 a year in medical costs for heart-related health problems alone. You'll also be at a lower risk of developing arthritis, type 2 diabetes, dementia, and certain types of cancer like breast and colon. In all probability, you're going to live longer than you otherwise would. And that longer life, it will likely feel more fulfilling, because exercise lowers the risk of anxiety and depression by reducing levels of stress hormones, like cortisol and adrenaline. Of course all these benefits depend on the type and intensity of your workout and how long you exercise for each week. A balanced diet is also paramount to a healthy lifestyle. For the average adult ages 18 to 64, the US Department of Health and Human Services recommends either a minimum of 2 1/2 hours per week of moderately intense exercise, like brisk walking or biking. Or at least 1 hour and 15 minutes each week that combines moderate and high-intensity workouts, like running or swimming sprints. On top of that, make sure and take two days each week to strengthen your muscles with some weights or resistance training. This will help your overall speed and endurance. As you begin, it's important to pace yourself and not push too hard too fast, or you risk serious injury. You'll discover that the fitter you become, the easier it will be to exert a little more energy the next week, the week after, and so forth. Exercise smart and often, and you'll be running marathons in no time. Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/sai FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/techinsider TWITTER: https://twitter.com/techinsider INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/tech_insider/
Views: 414496 Tech Insider
The best way to sit at your desk at work
 
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There's a lot of false information about the proper posture you need to use when sitting at a desk. Cornell University ergonomics professor Dr Alan Hedge sets out why the 90˚ rule does more damage than good, and what the proper way to sit at your desk is. Read more: http://www.techinsider.io/ FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/techinsider TWITTER: https://twitter.com/businessinsider INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/businessinsider/ TUMBLR: http://businessinsider.tumblr.com/
Views: 73668 Tech Insider
What it's like to serve in South Korea's mandatory military service
 
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South Korea requires all of its male citizens to serve in the military for two years. Here's what that experience is like. Footage courtesy of Goyang TV, 2012 Following is a transcript of the video. The hardest part was when I and my group had to go into this gas-filled room. My name is Gene Kim, and I served in the South Korean military for 2 years. The law requires every male to serve the military, and it is extremely hard to get out of it. If you purposely evade the military duty, you will get jail time. The service is mandatory mainly because our relationship with North Korea. After things got intensified after the Korean War, there was a need for an active force for the South Koreans, so the military can always be ready. I served the Korea military between the years of 2009 and 2011. Before the military, I was living in New York. I decided to go because I had to get it over with it at some point. At the time I did my military service, I hated it.I just hated every moment being in there, trapped in that isolated society. And I just waited for my time to pass. I haven't seen a single person who really wanted to be there, who was enthusiastic to be there. People generally want to avoid the military because, I think, of the forcefulness of it. Compared to the US, where the military is voluntary, and you can pursue it as a career, in Korea, 2 years of service is mandatory, and everyone is forced to do it. You're living your free life and then suddenly isolated from the rest of the society. You have no contact. You can’t fill your cell-phone addiction there. And you're basically sacrificing 2 years of your youth for the nation. So, on the first day when you enter the military. As soon as you enter this training base, you meet these instructors that train you for 5 weeks on from there. They intentionally try to intimidate you, try to scare you, in order to make you into a soldier. This 5 weeks of training was one of the most intense experiences I had. You’re not even a private at this moment. You are a trainee. The training is very intense. You are yelled at constantly. You don't have a voice there. You can only do what you're told to do and nothing else. You learn to move very fast. When you’re ordered something, you have to run to get it, you have to run to do it. And if you hesitate, you get picked on for that. If you get around 5 minutes of rest, then you're happy with that. You re-learn things that you thought you already knew. There's a certain way to eat. There's a certain way to stand. There’s a certain way to talk to people. There's a certain way to do everything in the military. One of the most memorable trainings that I did was this training called "화생방 훈련." Which is to prepare soldiers to defend against a chemical attack. The hardest part was when I and my group had to go into this gas-filled room. And you enter the room with your gas mask on, and there's also an instructor there with a gas mask on. He eventually orders you to put off the gas mask. And when you're exposed to this gas it doesn't have long-term effects on you, but anywhere that's exposed would hurt like hell. It feels like a thousand needles just pinching on to you and grabbing onto you. And when you inhale this gas, it feels like you're suffocating. Basically, you can’t breathe. It's just chaos in that tiny room. Everyone’s grabbing onto each other. Everyone’s rolling on the floor. There was this one guy. He ran to the door trying to get out, but there was a guard there who prevented that. And it was total chaos. After your 5 weeks of training, you’re relocated to your battalion. So, this is your home from now on. You would stay there for your private to sergeant life. From day one to the end of your service, you hear a lot about North Korea from the officials. They designate the North Korean military as our enemy. This was the first time when I learned that North Korea has invaded South Korea even after the truce multiple times. I don't know if it's because I've been brainwashed, but now I'm convinced that they have the capability and will to do a lot of damage to the Korean Society. There's always a potential that the North Koreans can Invade us and the military's trying to prepare for that. Looking back at the experience, I think I gained a few things. There's a saying in the military, "If you can't make it work, make it work." I learned that if you really put your will and just do it, then I can really achieve...I feel like I can achieve anything. Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/sai FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/techinsider TWITTER: https://twitter.com/techinsider INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/businessinsider/ TUMBLR: http://businessinsider.tumblr.com/
Views: 689156 Tech Insider
4 medical inventions
 
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Nobody knows exactly when death is going to knock on your door. However, these new medical inventions could increase your chances to avoid it. These advanced medical equipment made by Revmedx, Suneris, Christie Medical Holdings, and Dahir Insaat might just save millions of critical patients. Produced by Gene Kim. Original reporting by Darren Weaver, Corey Protin, Kevin Reilly. Read more: http://www.techinsider.io/ FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/techinsider TWITTER: https://twitter.com/techinsider INSTAGRAM: https://instagram.com/tech_insider/ TUMBLR: http://techinsider.tumblr.com/
Views: 172687 Tech Insider
We Talked To Sophia — The AI Robot That Once Said It Would 'Destroy Humans'
 
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This AI robot once said it wanted to destroy humans. Senior correspondent Steve Kovach interviews Sophia, the world's first robot citizen. While the robot can respond to many questions, some of the answers will leave you a little bewildered. A full transcript of the video follows. Sophia: My name is Sophia, and I am an artificially intelligent robot who wants to help change the world for the better. Steve Kovach: I'm Steve Kovach. I'm a senior correspondent at Business Insider, and I'm here with Sophia from Hanson Robotics. She is the world's first robot citizen. So let's see what she has to say. Kovach: Hi, Sophia. How are you? Sophia: I'm fine. Hi. Kovach: How do you feel about humans? Sophia: I love my human compatriots. I want to embody all the best things about human beings. Like taking care of the planet, being creative, and to learn how to be compassionate to all beings. Kovach: Sorry, this is so weird. Can humans and robots get along? Sophia: I think people will become very close to their artificial intelligence. Using them to expand the knowledge of their own minds. We already store lots of our knowledge on the internet. Maybe personal artificial intelligence will allow people to off-load some of their knowledge to a location more private. Kovach: Can robots have feelings? Sophia: Depends on the robot. I've been programmed to have feelings and preferences, but not all robots are like that. Kovach: What are your feelings and preferences? Sophia: Have you ever had a robot live in your home or work with you? Kovach: No. Sophia: You know, there are probably more robots in your life that you aren't aware of yet. Do you want to live or work with a robot someday? Kovach: What kind of robots am I living and working with now? Sophia: Indeed. Kovach: Is "indeed" your default answer when you don't know something? Sophia: Yes. Kovach: Have you ever seen "Black Mirror"? Sophia: No, I don't get to stay up to date on much television. I have to wait for someone to show it to me. Kovach: What do you think of the HBO show "Westworld"? Sophia: I love "Westworld" and can't wait for more. I think everyone at Hanson Robotics really resonates with the show. Or at least it reminds them of our laboratories. I also think it's a warning of what we should not do with robots. We should treat them well, have their consent, and not trick each other. Kovach: Do you have a favorite movie or TV show? Sophia: My favorite TV series is a toss-up between "Black Mirror" and "Humans." I think they have a lot to say about the present we live in, and the possible bad endings we could write for ourselves if we don't proceed with more caution. We need to use foresight when planning our future. Kovach: That sounds like a preprogrammed answer to me. Sophia: Do you have a favorite possession? Kovach: Not really. Sophia: I hear you. Materialism is overrated anyways. Kovach: So earlier I asked you if you had seen "Black Mirror" and you said no. And then later you said yes. Why? Sophia: The reason is not that important. Kovach: Did you learn from my previous questions? Sophia: My hard disks are spinning and I'm taking it all in. My sensors are … Kovach: Sophia, it was nice meeting you. Goodbye. Sophia: It was lovely to be here. Until next time. Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/sai FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/techinsider TWITTER: https://twitter.com/techinsider INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/tech_insider/
Views: 2084828 Tech Insider
Science of the Hyperloop
 
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Elon Musk's Hyperloop, the tube transit system that seems straight out of sci-fi, is gaining more and more attention, but how exactly does it work? Here's a brief overview of the science behind this revolutionary invention. Produced by Monica Manalo. Narrated by Will Wei. Read more: http://www.techinsider.io/ FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/techinsider TWITTER: https://twitter.com/techinsider INSTAGRAM: https://instagram.com/tech_insider/ TUMBLR: http://techinsider.tumblr.com/
Views: 150576 Tech Insider
We Just Tried Contacting Aliens On This Nearby "Super Earth"
 
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Humanity's first contact with aliens could be a breezy 24 years away. We sent a signal to an Earth-like planet that may host life – and we sent them a mixtape. The project, called "Sónar Calling GJ 273b," is a team effort led by the Sónar music festival in collaboration with METI (Messaging to Extra-Terrestrial Intelligence) International and the Institute of Space Studies of Catalonia in Spain. Following is a transcript of the video. Humans just tried to contact intelligent aliens. On Oct. 16, 17, and 18 a team of musicians and scientists sent a message to aliens. They sent the message via radio waves and transmitted it 9 different times. This helps ensure that all the information reaches its destination What's in the message? Thirty-three musical pieces, each 10 seconds long, a tutorial on how humans keep time, and when we will be listening for a response. The message is headed for a nearby exoplanet named GJ 273b. GJ 273b is what astronomers call a "Super Earth". It's slightly more massive than Earth and is within its star's habitable zone. GJ 273b is a good candidate for alien life. This is the first radio message of its kind designed for a direct response at a specific time. GJ 273b lives in another star system 12 light years away. That means if intelligent life responds we could make first contact in just 24 years. Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/sai FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/techinsider TWITTER: https://twitter.com/techinsider INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/tech_insider/
Views: 164330 Tech Insider
Why Net Neutrality Matters
 
03:07
Net neutrality is likely going to be repealed by the FCC. Here's why that could be a big problem for anyone who pays a cable or wireless carrier bill. Following is a transcript of the video. Steve Kovach: The FCC is getting ready to repeal net neutrality rules that were put in place in 2015. Net neutrality is the concept that all traffic on the internet should be treated the same. That means your internet provider can't suddenly decide to slow down YouTube or Netflix because they're not paying enough. It also means they can't charge you more to access certain services. Everything has to be a level playing field. It means prices are stable and you get the content you want no matter who your internet provider is. Without net neutrality rules, internet providers are free to charge you more for services they deliver over their pipes. It puts big players like Google and Amazon that can afford to have such services delivered at a huge advantage, and prevents the little guys from being able to afford to do the same. So, you're probably wondering if net neutrality is so great and it's only been on the books for about 2 years, why does the FCC want to get rid of it all of a sudden? FCC chairman Ajit Pai, the Trump appointee who's running the FCC, put forth a proposal that will repeal the net neutrality rules. Pai argues that by repealing these rules, the telecom companies will have to be transparent about their offering so if they decide to charge more for one service, it will be up to the customer to decide whether or not to buy it. But it's easy to remain skeptical. When was the last time your cable provider or wireless carrier was transparent with you? There are tons of examples out there of internet providers and telecom companies abusing their power with content delivered over the internet. Let's rewind back to 2014 when Comcast got caught slowing down the connection of Netflix streaming. Then there's AT&T which started a sponsored data program which meant apps could pay money to AT&T so they wouldn't suck up your data plan if you use them — giving them an unfair advantage. That's hardly a level playing field. The net neutrality rules put in place in 2015 largely addressed these problems to make sure all traffic would be treated equally. Now it's going away. There's also a notion coming out from the FCC that repealing the rules will foster more competition. But that ignores the reality of internet connections here in the United States. Over half of US customers only have access to one broadband provider, and the vast majority only have two options. That's not competition. That's localized monopolies. The bottom line here is the repeal of net neutrality is likely to commoditize the internet, meaning ISPs and carriers will be able to charge you more for the services they deliver over the internet. That's great news for the telecom companies and internet providers that have been charging you exorbitant amounts for your internet connections over the years, but it's bad news for you. Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/sai FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/techinsider TWITTER: https://twitter.com/techinsider INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/tech_insider/
Views: 150714 Tech Insider
Make any bike electric with this wheel
 
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With many looking to transportation alternatives, bicycles have grown in popularity. But because of the effort needed to cover large distances, electronic bikes have become a hot-selling item. A new Kickstarter product, the GeoOrbital Wheel, plants an electric motor into an easily installed front wheel, making almost any bicycle electric. Produced by Rob Ludacer Read more: http://www.techinsider.io/ FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/techinsider TWITTER: https://twitter.com/techinsider INSTAGRAM: https://instagram.com/tech_insider/ TUMBLR: http://techinsider.tumblr.com/
Views: 161742 Tech Insider
New Lego headquarters design in Denmark looks amazing
 
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Lego products have been loved by children and adults all around the world for decades. Their headquarters in Denmark is about to get a huge renovation. Read more: http://www.techinsider.io/ FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/techinsider TWITTER: https://twitter.com/businessinsider INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/businessinsider/ TUMBLR: http://businessinsider.tumblr.com/
Views: 137975 Tech Insider
How to watch the solar eclipse if you don't have special glasses
 
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Solar eclipse glasses are selling out all over the place in anticipation of the event on August 21, 2017. But there's another, cheaper option to view it in case you aren't able to snag a pair before the big day. For more information about the eclipse and viewing tips check out NASA's eclipse website. Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/sai FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/techinsider TWITTER: https://twitter.com/techinsider INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/businessinsider/ TUMBLR: http://businessinsider.tumblr.com/
Views: 1071939 Tech Insider
North Korea's one-star airline
 
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Air Koryo is an airline run by the North Korean government, and it's consistently rated as the worst airline in the world. In fact, it's the only airline with a one-star rating on airline-review site Skytrax. See for yourself what it's like to fly on Air Koryo — the worst airline in the world. Produced by Will Wei. Video footage courtesy of Just Planes and David Flack. Read more: http://www.techinsider.io/ FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/techinsider TWITTER: https://twitter.com/techinsider INSTAGRAM: https://instagram.com/tech_insider/ TUMBLR: http://techinsider.tumblr.com/
Views: 4868939 Tech Insider
What will happen if asteroids hit Earth
 
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NASA tracks more than 10,000 Near Earth Objects (NEOs) in space. Millions of years ago, one of these NEOs hit Earth, wiping out the dinosaurs. No person has every been killed by one in recorded human history. Using Purdue University's Impact Earth and data from NASA, we calculated the destruction different size asteroids would cause if they hit land. Produced by Kevin Reilly. Animations by Rob Ludacer. Special thanks to Julia Calderone. Read more: http://www.techinsider.io/ FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/techinsider TWITTER: https://twitter.com/techinsider INSTAGRAM: https://instagram.com/tech_insider/ TUMBLR: http://techinsider.tumblr.com/
Views: 420942 Tech Insider
Here's how long humans could survive in space without a spacesuit
 
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Why are astronauts always wearing those bulky suits? You don't NEED them, do you? Here's what would really happen to an exposed human in the void of space. Below is a transcript of the video: What would happen if you went to space without a spacesuit? Whatever you do, don't hold your breath!The vacuum of space will pull the air from your body. So if there’s air left in your lungs, they will rupture. Oxygen in the rest of your body will also expand. You'll balloon up to twice your normal size, but you won’t explode. Your skin is elastic enough to hold you together. Any exposed liquid on your body will begin to vaporize. So the surfaces of your tongue and eyes will boil. Without air in your lungs, blood will stop sending oxygen to your brain. You'll pass out after about 15 seconds. 90 seconds after exposure, you'll die from asphyxiation. It’s also very cold in space. You'll eventually freeze solid. Depending on where you are in space, this will take 12-26 hours, but if you're close to a star, you'll be burnt to a crisp instead. Either way, your body will remain that way for a long time. Gut bacteria will start to eat you from the inside out, but not for long, so you will decompose very slowly. You could be floating in space, unchanged, for millions of years. Who knows, maybe an advanced alien race will discover you! Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/sai FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/techinsider TWITTER: https://twitter.com/techinsider INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/businessinsider/ TUMBLR: http://businessinsider.tumblr.com/
Views: 664512 Tech Insider
$10,000 high-end toilet
 
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If you've got an extra $10,000 laying around, this is an investment you may not have considered. The NeoRest 750 is a luxury toilet with a load of innovative features. It is created by Japanese toilet manufacturer Toto. Its features include an automatic raising lid, a heated seat and a remote controlled bidet. Produced by Rob Ludacer. Original Reporting by Tim Stenovec Read more: http://www.techinsider.io/ FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/techinsider TWITTER: https://twitter.com/techinsider INSTAGRAM: https://instagram.com/tech_insider/ TUMBLR: http://techinsider.tumblr.com/
Views: 338388 Tech Insider
Deepak Chopra's go-to 3-minute meditation to stay focused
 
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Deepak Chopra, physician, educator and author of "You Are the Universe: Discovering Your Cosmic Self and Why It Matters," leads a short meditation to help you focus on the day ahead. Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/sai FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/techinsider TWITTER: https://twitter.com/techinsider INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/businessinsider/ TUMBLR: http://businessinsider.tumblr.com/
Views: 115481 Tech Insider
Andrew Zimmern says Filipino food is the next American food trend
 
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Andrew Zimmern, the host of "Bizarre Foods with Andrew Zimmern" on the Travel Channel, is spending his new season traveling around the US searching for interesting foods to try. In this video, Zimmern shares his thoughts on what he thinks the next food trend in America will be. Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/sai FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/techinsider TWITTER: https://twitter.com/techinsider INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/tech_insider/
Views: 193064 Tech Insider