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Know Your Rights: Is Ohio an Open Carry State?
 
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Know Your Rights: Is Ohio an Open Carry State?
Cleveland's Case Western Reserve University School of Law
 
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Situated on the southern shore of Lake Erie, Cleveland is an exciting, thriving and affordable place to live, learn, work and play. With a strong legal community, it's the perfect place to begin your legal studies.
How to Negotiate so Everyone Wins, Especially You!
 
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November 15, 2010 CISCDR Fifth Anniversary Distinguished Visitor Lecture presented by the Center for the Interdisciplinary Study of Conflict and Dispute Resolution Case Western Reserve University School of Law Speaker: Ronald M. Shapiro Shapiro Negotiations Institute Summary: Negotiations expert, attorney, sports agent, and award-winning author Ron Shapiro will share the key principles of effective negotiations — for getting what you want while building stronger relationships. His method includes focusing on client needs through listening and the 3P's: Prepare-Probe-Propose, and is the subject of his book, The Power of Nice: How to Negotiate So Everyone Wins -- Especially You!.
Human Rights & Humanitarian Law - Conflict or Convergence
 
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April 7, 2010 Klatsky Seminar in Human Rights presented by the Frederick K. Cox International Law Center
The Future of Abortion Rights: Whole Woman's Health v. Cole
 
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Faculty View from CWRU, Episode 2 Jessie Hill Associate Dean for Academic Affairs Interview by Julia Aromatorio '16 Co-president, CWRU chapter, Law Students for Reproductive Justice
How Rejection Affects People
 
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April 5, 2012 How Rejection Affects People Elmer F. and Ellen Laws Burwig Lecture presented by the Center for the Interdisciplinary Study of Conflict and Dispute Resolution Case Western Reserve University School of Law Speaker: Roy F. Baumeister, PhD Eppes Eminent Scholar and Professor of Psychology Florida State University
The Fourth Amendment: Is There a Future?
 
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September 12, 2012 The Fourth Amendment: Is There a Future? Case Downtown Lecture Series The City Club of Cleveland Speaker: Lewis R. Katz John C. Hutchins Professor of Law Director, LLM in U.S. and Global Legal Studies Program Case Western Reserve University School of Law Summary: Professor Katz discusses recent Fourth Amendment developments, and some that may be down the road. He focuses on United States v. Jones where five members of the Supreme Court indicated a need to rethink the Katz privacy formula which has been used for 40 years to limit Fourth Amendment rights. Secondly, Professor Katz discusses the disappearing Fourth Amendment protections for motorists on the streets and highways of America.
Natural Rights, Enumerated Rights, and the Ninth Amendment
 
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October 15, 2008 Speaker: Michael W. McConnell, Presidential Professor of Law, Judge, 10th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals Summary: The Sumner Canary Lecture When faced with drafting a Bill of Rights, members of the First Congress were faced with an impossible problem: what to include and what to leave out. Lockean theory told them that after construction of a social compact, such as the Constitution, the people would retain all rights not relinquished to the state. But what was the legal status of those retained rights, and how would they be affected by the explicit enumeration of some but not all of them? Michael W. McConnell joined the faculty of S.J. Quinney College of Law in 1997 after teaching at the University of Chicago Law School for 12 years, where he was William B. Graham Professor of Law. Prior to his teaching career, Professor McConnell served as assistant to the solicitor general with the U.S. Department of Justice, assistant general counsel for the U.S. Office of Management and Budget, and clerked for Chief Judge J. Skelly Wright, of the District of Columbia U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals. He also served a clerkship with U.S. Supreme Court Justice William J. Brennan. Among the country's most distinguished scholars in the fields of constitutional law and theory with a specialty in the religion clauses of the First Amendment, Professor McConnell has argued 11 times before the U.S. Supreme Court. He is widely published in the areas of church-state relations and the First Amendment. He is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and was sworn in as a judge on the 10th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals on January 3, 2003. Professor McConnell teaches constitutional law, family law, state and local government, religion and the First Amendment.
The International Criminal Court and the Crime of Aggression - Panel 4
 
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September 26, 2008 War Crimes Research Symposium presented by the Frederick K. Cox International Law Center Panel 4 A Roundtable Discussion about the Process by which Aggression is Included in the Statute and its Effect on Non-Party States Moderator: Don Ferencz, Director, The Planethood Foundation, Prof. M. Cherif Bassiouni, DePaul University College of Law, Prof. Roger Clark, Rutgers University School of Law, Astrid Reisinger Coracini, University of Graz, Austria, Stefan Barriga, Counsellor/Legal Adviser, Permanent Mission of Lichtenstein to the U.N. Summary: Sixty years ago, the Nuremberg Tribunal convicted the Nazi leaders of waging a war of aggression, prompting Nuremberg Prosecutor Robert Jackson to declare that this was the most important contribution of the Nuremberg Tribunal. Until the advent of the International Criminal Court, however, none of the modern international tribunals had been given jurisdiction over the crime of aggression. But the ICC Statute stipulates that before the Court can exercise jurisdiction over this crime the States Parties must adopt a provision at the Review Conference (scheduled for 2010) setting forth a definition of aggression and the conditions under which the Court could exercise its jurisdiction over it. The ICC Assembly of State Parties has set up a Special Working Group on the Crime of Aggression, whose work is in progress, but the United States has refused to participate in the proceedings. In an effort to advance the initiative, Case Western Reserve Universitys Frederick K. Cox International law Center and the above named co-sponsors are hosting a symposium and experts meeting, featuring foremost academic and international experts on the topic of the ICC and the Crime of Aggression. The Report of the Experts Meeting, along with articles generated from the symposium, will be published in the spring 2009 issue of the Case Western Journal of International Law, copies of which will be provided to the participants of the ICC Special Working Group and the members of the Assembly of State Parties.
Prosecutorial Ethics and the Right to a Fair Trial: The Role of the Brady Rule (Session 2)
 
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January 26, 2007 Presented by: Case Western Reserve Law Review Speakers: Professor Paul C. Giannelli, Albert J. Weatherhead III and Richard W. Weatherhead Professor, Case School of Law Professor Peter A. Joy, Professor of Law and Director of the Criminal Justice Clinic, Washington University in St. Louis School of Law Jonathan Leiken, Associate, Corporate Criminal Investigations Practice, Jones Day , Adjunct Assistant Professor, Case School of Law Summary: Law Review Symposium: Panel Two: Brady and Jailhouse Snitches In Brady v. Maryland (1963), the United States Supreme Court held that a defendant's due process rights preclude a prosecutor from suppressing material evidence favorable to the defendant. Since the Court's ruling, the Brady rule has shaped the boundaries of a defendant's right to a fair trial and defined the standards of justice in the criminal system. The Case Western Reserve Law Review Symposium will explore the role of the Brady rule in various elements of a criminal case, including plea negotiations, scientific evidence and capital sentencing. Participants will also discuss the Brady rule's impact on prosecutorial ethics in the current justice system. Please join us as many of the country's leading experts examine the issues that are critical for maintaining each citizen's right to a fair and just trial.
What Makes a Great Legal Negotiator?
 
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March 31, 2011 "What Makes a Great Legal Negotiator?" Elmer F. & Ellen Laws Burwig Lecture - CISCDR 5th Anniversary Distinguished Visiting Scholar Lecture - presented by the Center for the Interdisciplinary Study of Conflict & Dispute Resolution Speaker: Charles B. Craver Freda H. Alverson Professor George Washington University Law School Summary: Lawyers negotiate repeatedly, but few have thought about the factors that are possessed by proficient negotiators. Over the past thirty years, I have tried to determine the factors that contribute to negotiating success. I have found no statistically significant differences among students in my Legal Negotiating classes based upon race, sex, or nationality. I have found no correlation between student GPAs or emotional intelligence and negotiation results.
International Law in Crisis - Main Lecture
 
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September 9, 2011 International Law in Crisis - Main Lecture Frederick K. Cox International Law Center Case Western Reserve University School of Law Speaker: Honorable Richard Goldstone, former Justice, Constitutional Court of South Africa; former Prosecutor of the International Criminal Tribunals for the former Yugoslavia and Rwanda
An American Sickness: How Healthcare became Big Business and How You Can Take it Back
 
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March 6, 2017 "An American Sickness: How Healthcare became Big Business and How You Can Take it Back" The Oliver C. Schroeder Jr. Scholar-in-Residence Lecture
Pursuing Human Rights Violators in America: the Office of Special Investigations at 25
 
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February 22, 2006 Speaker: Eli M. Rosenbaum, Director of the Office of Special Investigations' Criminal Division at the United States Department of Justice Presented by: Frederick K. Cox International Law Center Summary: Klatsky Seminar in Human Rights •The Office of Special Investigations (OSI) and emerging war crimes •Nazis and other perpetrators of genocide, torture or extrajudicial killings are not welcomed here: a look back at a quarter century of prosecuting persecutors •Prosecuting persecutors: the future role of the OSI Eli M. Rosenbaum is the longest-serving prosecutor and investigator of Nazi criminals in world history, having served at the U.S. Department of Justice in that capacity for more than twenty years. Numerous Nazi criminals have been brought to justice and deported through his work in the Office of Special Investigations (OSI), which has won several distinguished awards under Mr. Rosenbaum's leadership, including one from the Holocaust Survivors and Friends Education Center.
Making International Arbitration Suitable for the 21st Century
 
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Oct. 19, 2011 Making International Arbitration Suitable for the 21st Century Distinguished Visiting Practitioner Lecture presented by the Center for the Interdisciplinary Study of Conflict and Dispute Resolution Speaker: David W. Rivkin Partner Debevoise & Plimpton LLC
Health Law at Case Western Reserve University School of Law
 
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Find out why our law school is the best place to study health law, one of the nation's fastest-growing legal fields. Our program is ranked 3rd in the nation. In this video, our students and recent graduates talk about their experiences and careers in health law. Cleveland is home to two of the nation's best hospitals, Cleveland Clinic and University Hospitals, and is the perfect location to study health law.
Collective Memory
 
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March 2, 2011 Collective Memory: How the Present Shapes the Past Told through a Philadelphia Story About George Washington and Slavery Speaker: Marc Howard Ross William Rand Kenan, Jr. Professor Department of Political Science Bryn Mawr College Summary: Collective memory is increasingly discussed as an important feature of large group behavior. Prof. Ross will outline conceptual tools for the analysis of collective memory and how present needs shape what is told and retained about the past: narratives, symbols and rituals, and symbolic landscapes as well as an empirically useful way to understand collective memory and its role in ethnic and racial conflict and conflict mitigation. To illustrate the approach, he will consider the case of race in the United States and especially the phenomenon of slavery in both the north and the south. He will emphasize the role of selective forgetting in the north and how only in recent years has the story of slavery and segregation there been publicly considered.
The Bomber Generals and the New Laws of War: Terror, Romance, and American Air Power
 
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March 20, 2008 Speaker: Elizabeth Hillman, Visiting Professor, University of California Hastings College of the Law Presented by: the Institute for Global Security Law and Policy Summary: Distinguished Lecture in Global Security Law & Policy Topics addressed include: The legal and military history of U.S. bombing since World War II Legality of orders, weapons, armed conflict and the role of public opinion in shaping judicial decisions. The impact of charismatic leaders on military power, the romanticization of air power, and the history of civilian targeting in U.S. warfare. Elizabeth L. Hillman is Professor of Law at Rutgers University School of Law, Camden. Her work focuses on U.S. military law and history since the mid-20th century, especially the definition and prosecution of military crime and the role of gender and sexuality in military law and culture. She authored Defending America: Military Culture and the Cold War Court-Martial (Princeton University Press, 2005) and co-authored Military Justice: Cases and Materials (LexisNexis, 2007, w/ Fidell and Sullivan). For 2007-08, she is Visiting Professor of Law at the University of California Hastings College of the Law in San Francisco.
An Introduction to the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act and Court
 
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February 24, 2014 An Introduction to the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act and Court Institute for Global Security Law and Policy Case Western Reserve University School of Law Speaker: Judge James Carr Senior United States District Judge in the United States District Court
The LLM Programs at Case Western Reserve University School of Law
 
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Learn about the LLM programs at Case Western Reserve University School of Law.
International Arbitration & Cross Border Business Transactions: Making the Right Choices
 
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Feb. 19, 2016 "International Arbitration & Cross Border Business Transactions: Making the Right Choices" Case Western Reserve University School of Law Speakers: Stephen P. Anway Rocío Dígon Lawrence S. Schaner Terry Szmagala Soeun (Nikole) Lee Summary: A panel of experts discusses choices in international arbitration, with specific topics including choosing between arbitration and litigation, drafting an arbitration clause, characteristics of ICC arbitration, selection of arbitrators, and interim relief and emergency arbitrators. The conference is co-sponsored by The Frederick K. Cox International Law Center at Case Western Reserve University School of Law, the International Court of Arbitration of the International Chamber of Commerce (ICC), United States Council for International Business (USCIB) and Squire Patton Boggs.
The Memory of Justice: The Unexpected Place of Lviv, Ukraine in International Law
 
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January 12, 2011 Klatsky Seminar in Human Rights presented by the Frederick K. Cox International Law Center Case Western Reserve University School of Law Speaker: Philippe Sands Professor of Law University College of London Summary: Philippe Sands discusses the unprecedented contributions of Hersch Lauterpacht, Rafael Lemkin, and Louis Sohn in helping to forge modern international law. Studying and working in eastern Europe in the early 1900s, these three great legal minds together drafted Nuremberg Statute Article 6, the Genocide Convention, and the International Court of Justice Statute.
Native American Tribes' & Nations' Rights to Their Intellectual Property
 
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March 3, 2016 "Native American Tribes' & Nations' Rights to Their Intellectual Property" Case Western reserve University School of Law Spangenberg Center for Law, Technology & the Arts Speaker: Preston Hardison Policy Analyst for the Tulalip Tribes of Washington Summary: Indigenous peoples and nations have a wealth of knowledge and resources related to their traditional ways of life. That is found in traditional knowledge, Folklore and in genetic resources which are extremely valuable to the communities and, with the advent of the knowledge economy, increasingly valuable to non-indigenous communities and corporations. However, this increased interest in traditional knowledge, traditional cultural expressions and genetic resources has increased the risk, the perception and the reality of the misappropriation of indigenous knowledge, ranging from biopiracy to cultural misappropriation, to denigration and misuse of indigenous cultural icons and sacred knowledge. In many case, misappropriation is enabled by the mainstream intellectual property system through patenting, or copyright or trademarks. In order to combat this, indigenous peoples and nations have sought to vindicate their rights both at the domestic level and in international bodies such as the World Intellectual Property Organisation. Native American groups have played an important role in these efforts and the lecture will discuss the nature of the domestic and international challenges that Native American tribes face in claiming rights to their intellectual property, including traditional knowledge, cultural expressions and genetic resources.
A Conversation with the Chief Prosecutor of United States Military Commissions
 
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I created this video with the YouTube Video Editor (http://www.youtube.com/editor)
Cyber Harassment and Cyber Stalking: The New Frontier of Civil Rights in the Twenty-First Century
 
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February 26, 2015 "Cyber Harassment and Cyber Stalking: The New Frontier of Civil Rights in the Twenty-First Century" The Center for Cyberspace Law & Policy Distinguished Lecture Case Western Reserve University School of Law Speaker: Danielle Keats Citron
Improving the Quality of Health Care: Where Law, Accreditation, and Professionalism Collide
 
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October 25, 2012 Improving the Quality of Health Care: where Law, Accreditation, and Professionalism Collide Oliver C. Schroeder, Jr. Scholar-in-Residence Lecture Presented by the Law-Medicine Center Case Western Reserve University School of Law Speaker: Mark R. Chassin President and CEO The Joint Commission
Victims before International Criminals Courts: A Challenge for International Criminal Justice
 
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November 21, 2011 Klatsky Seminar in Human Rights Presented by the Frederick K. Cox International Law Center Speaker: Hon. Christine Van den Wyngaert Judge, International Criminal Court Victim participation in international criminal justice is a new trend of the 21st century. Although victims had access to international justice before the human rights courts were established, the international criminal court (ICC) has gone a step further by allowing them to participate in criminal proceedings. In addition, the ICC-system allows the Court to order reparations. This system, which seems closer to civil law than common law, poses important legal questions and practical challenges when applied before international criminal courts, in cases involving massive numbers of victims. With the first two trials at the ICC nearing completion, the picture of what victim participation means in practice is gradually emerging.
Prosecutorial Ethics and the Right to a Fair Trial: The Role of the Brady Rule (Session 1)
 
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January 26, 2007 Presented by: Case Western Reserve Law Review Speakers: Professor Lewis R. Katz, John C. Hutchins Professor; Director of the Master of Laws in U.S. and Global Legal Studies Program Professor Kevin C. McMunigal, Judge Ben C. Green Professor, Case School of Law Professor John G. Douglass, Professor of Law, University of Richmond School of Law Scott Roger Hurley, Public Defender, Cuyahoga County Public Defender Office Summary: Law Review Symposium: Brady v. Maryland and Panel One: Brady and Plea Negotiations In Brady v. Maryland (1963), the United States Supreme Court held that a defendant's due process rights preclude a prosecutor from suppressing material evidence favorable to the defendant. Since the Court's ruling, the Brady rule has shaped the boundaries of a defendant's right to a fair trial and defined the standards of justice in the criminal system. The Case Western Reserve Law Review Symposium will explore the role of the Brady rule in various elements of a criminal case, including plea negotiations, scientific evidence and capital sentencing. Participants will also discuss the Brady rule's impact on prosecutorial ethics in the current justice system. Please join us as many of the country's leading experts examine the issues that are critical for maintaining each citizen's right to a fair and just trial.
Affirmative Action as Government Speech: A First Amendment Analysis of the Colorblindness Doctrine
 
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October 4, 2010 "Affirmative Action as Government Speech: A First Amendment Analysis of the Colorblindness Doctrine" Arthur W. Fiske Memorial Lecture Case Western Reserve University School of Law Speaker: William Carter Professor, Temple University Beasley School of Law Summary: The colorblindness doctrine is best understood as implicitly holding that non-disadvantaging affirmative action constitutes an expressive harm. This article will expand upon the existing scholarship by arguing that functionally, the Court has come to view race-conscious, non-disadvantaging government action as a form of prohibited government speech. In essence, the Court has decided that when the government takes such action, it is sending an unconstitutional message that race still matters in our society. Under the government speech doctrine, however, the government is free to express its own message provided it does not restrict or compel private speech. The fact that members of the Court disagree with this message does not make it unconstitutional.
Lawfare: Introduction
 
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September 10, 2010 War Crimes Research Symposium Frederick K. Cox International Law Center Case Western Reserve University School of Law Speakers: Dean Robert Rawson, Case Western Reserve University School of Law Prof. Michael Scharf, director, Cox Center, Case Western Reserve University School of Law Prof. Michael Kelly, president, AIDP, Creighton University School of Law Summary: Traditionally "Lawfare" was defined as "a strategy of using—or misusing—law as a substitute for traditional military means to achieve an operational objective." But lately, commentators and governments have applied the concept to International Criminal Tribunals, the defense counsel's tactics challenging the detention of al Qaeda suspects in Guantanamo Bay, and as indicated in the quote above to the controversial Goldstone Commission Report. This symposium and Experts Meeting, featuring two-dozen leading academics, practitioners, and former government officials from all sides of the political spectrum, will examine the usefulness and appropriate application of the "Lawfare" concept.
International Law Program - Case Western Reserve University
 
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We invite you to watch this short video and learn from our faculty and students about Case Western Reserve University School of Law's unique and exciting international law program (ranked 15th best in the country).
Institutional Investors in Corporate Governance: Heroes Or Villains? - Part 1
 
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April 17, 2009 Institutional Investors in Corporate Governance: Heroes Or Villains? Panel I -- An Institutional Investor's Perspective George A. Leet Business Law Symposium presented by the Center for Business Law and Regulation Case Western Reserve University School of Law John Wilcox, Chairman of Sodali, Ltd. (international investor advisory consulting firm) former Senior VP and Head of Corporate Governance, TIAA-CREF Katherine Combs, Senior Vice President, Corporate Governance; Corporate Secretary; and Deputy General Counsel, Exelon Corporation Prof. Simon Peck, Weatherhead School of Management, Case Western Reserve University Summary: The Symposium addresses a wide range of issues in the corporate and securities field, including: Shareholder voting, SEC proxy rules on shareholder voting and shareholder proposals; the role of proxy advisory services; the validity of shareholder initiatives in corporate governance; the role of hedge funds and sovereign wealth funds in corporate governance; the role of tender offers and defenses against tender offers (including staggered boards and poison pills); the propriety of current levels of executive compensation, the effectiveness of various elements of executive compensation as appropriate incentives, the role of shareholders in approving executive compensation; and the effects of devices that separate voting rights from the economic interests of common stock ownership.
Torture and the War on Terror. Panel 1: Whats Wrong with Torture?
 
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October 7, 2005 Sponsored by: Frederick K. Cox International Law Center Co-sponsored by: the Institute for Global Security Law and Policy Moderator: Professor Robert Lawry, Case School of Law; Director, Center for Professional Ethics, Case Defining Torture Professor David Sussman, University of Illinois Exceptionalism 3: Torture American Style Professor Henry Shue, Oxford University Torture: Morality and Convention Professor Jeff McMahan, Rutgers University
Can you patent marijuana?
 
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Third-year law student Sarah Siedlak and Professor Craig Nard discuss this challenge, from patentability requirements to the federal illegality of marijuana.
Launching your International Law Career at CWRU
 
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Hear from students and alums about Case Western Reserve University School of Law's highly-ranked international law program, and how it launched them on their career in international law.
Against Integrative Bargaining
 
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October 3, 2007 Speaker: Russell Korobkin, Professor of Law, University of California, Los Angeles Presented by: Center for the Interdisciplinary Study of Conflict & Dispute Resolution (CISCDR) Summary: CISCDR Distinguished Scholar-in-Residence Lecture For the last quarter-century, the heart of negotiation theory has been that negotiators should emphasize integrative bargaining approaches, known as "problem-solving," "value creating," or "win-win" negotiation, while setting aside tactics that attempt to claim value at the expense of the other negotiator. What are the common tactics for achieving integrative potential in negotiations? What is the potential for gains at the bargaining table, using distributive tactics? How can negotiators choose the most appropriate method for the situation? At the University of California, Los Angeles, Russell Korobkin teaches Negotiation, Contracts, and Health Care Law. This year, he is a visiting professor at Harvard Law School. Prof. Korobkin regularly teaches abbreviated negotiation courses at universities in the U.S., Europe, and Australia, conducts negotiation training workshops for lawyers, and provides mediation services. He authored the textbook Negotiation Theory and Strategy (Aspen Law & Business, 2002) and more than 40 scholarly articles on negotiation and other topics, including "Roadblocks to the Road Map: A Negotiation Theory Perspective on the Past Failures and Future Prospects of Land for Peace" (Yale Journal Of International Law), "Psychological Barriers to Mediation Success" (Ohio State Journal of Dispute Resolution), "Aspirations and Settlement" (Cornell Law Review), and "A Positive Theory of Legal Negotiation" (Georgetown Law Journal). Prof. Korobkin received his B.A. and J.D. degrees from Stanford University, clerked for the Honorable James L. Buckley of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit, and worked as an associate at the law firm of Covington and Burling in Washington, D.C.
Torture and the War on Terror. Legal, Moral, and Policy Implications...
 
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October 7, 2005 Sponsored by: Frederick K. Cox International Law Center Co-sponsored by: the Institute for Global Security Law and Policy Introduction: 2005 AIDP Book of the Year Award winners Professor Ellen Podgor, Georgia State University College of Law, and Professor Roger Clark, Rutgers School of Law - Camden Speaker: M. Cherif Bassiouni, Professor DePaul University, formerly UN Rapporteur for Afghanistan
Hardball Negotiating Tactics: Why They Work & How They Can Fail So Badly
 
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September 19, 2007 Speaker: Max Factor III, Esq., Factor Mediation & Arbitration Services, Inc. Presented by: the Center for the Interdisciplinary Study of Conflict & Dispute Resolution Summary: CISCDR Distinguished Visitor Lecture How do hardball negotiating tactics affect the people, the discussion, and the results of a negotiation? Mr. Factor will look at this topic from a range of reason-based and emotion-based perspectives, including: disarming knowledge seeking inquiries persuasive emotion-based tactics effective tactics based on cognitive psychology research humanistic and anecdotal moments of transformational impact greater understanding through research in neuroscience. One of Southern California's leading mediators, Max Factor III, Esq. is a Fellow of the International Academy of Mediators, Chair of the Committee on Administration of Justice for the California State Bar (2006-07), Past President of the Southern California Mediation Association (2005-06), and a member of the National Panel of Neutrals of the American Bar Association. He was chosen as one of the 27 Top Neutrals by Best Lawyers® 2006, as well as being repeatedly selected a "Super Lawyer." Mr. Factor is an Adjunct Professor at Pepperdine Law School, teaching graduate students and Master's candidates at the Straus Institute's Dispute Resolution Clinic. A graduate of Harvard College, magna cum laude in Economics, and of Yale Law School, Mr. Factor was an editor of the Yale Law Review. His mediation practice builds on three decades of experience as a highly regarded business and litigation attorney, combined with an intuitive ability to motivate disputants to accept workable resolutions.
The Israeli-Palestinian Peace Process and What It Tells Us About Negotiations
 
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March 21, 2006 Speaker: Ambassador Dennis B. Ross, Former Special Middle East Coordinator; Counselor and Ziegler Distinguished Fellow at the Washington Institute for Near East Policy Presented by: Center for the Interdisciplinary Study of Conflict and Dispute Resolution (CISCDR) Summary: CISCDR Distinguished Visitor Lecture •A key starting point for any negotiation is knowing what you want. Israelis weren't sure; Palestinians were •What can we learn from the Israeli-Palestinian negotiations and other aspects of the reality of negotiations? Ambassador Dennis B. Ross is Counselor and Ziegler Distinguished Fellow at The Washington Institute for Near East Policy, and the first chairman of the Institute for Jewish People Policy Planning. For more than twelve years, Mr. Ross played the leading role in shaping U.S. involvement in the Middle East peace process in the administrations of presidents George H. W. Bush and Bill Clinton. As the architect of the peace process, he was instrumental in assisting the Israelis and Palestinians in reaching the 1995 Interim Agreement, and he successfully brokered the Hebron Accord in 1997. He also facilitated the Israeli-Jordan peace treaty and worked intensively to bring Israel and Syria together.
Making a Living, Creatively: The Role of Intellectual Property
 
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October 7, 2009 Speaker: Robert P. Merges, Director, Berkeley Center for Law & Technology, Berkeley Law, University of California, Berkeley Summary: In his lecture, Robert P. Merges will revisit the idea of property rights over intellectual creations. He will begin with philosophical foundations, and then looks at contemporary debates over the continuing viability and future direction of this body of law. He will emphasize how Intellectual Property rights permit people to earn a living from their creative works, and explain why this matters. He will also discuss how the law can and must square two competing ideas: the right of an individual to exercise control over his or her creative works, and the interests of third parties, broadly conceived, whose needs justify limits on and intrusions into the protected sphere of Intellectual Property rights.
Mandatory Employment Arbitration: Keeping It Fair, Keeping It Lawful"
 
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November 19, 2009 Center for the Interdisciplinary Study of Conflict and Dispute Resolution Rush McKnight Labor Law Lecture Case Western Reserve University School of Law Speaker: Theodore J. St. Antoine James E. and Sarah A. Degan Professor of Law Emeritus University of Michigan Law School Summary: Agreements requiring employees to arbitrate all disputes with their employers, including statutory claims, instead of taking them to court, have become highly controversial. As a condition of getting or keeping a job, employees must waive their right to go before a judge and jury to pursue their cases. Yet in addition to saving the employer high litigation costs and devastating jury awards, so-called mandatory arbitration may give ordinary lower-paid employees the only practical means of enforcing their job rights. Courts are increasingly insisting on due process safeguards in these systems. Practitioners in the employment field should know about the pros and cons of mandatory arbitration agreements, and about the fast-moving legal developments concerning their validity.
The Future of Human Rights
 
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November 6, 2008 Speaker: Geoffrey Robertson QC, former Appeals Judge, Special Court for Sierra Leone Presented by: The Frederick K. Cox International Law Center Summary: Geoffrey Robertson will map the future of the fast-growing field of human rights law. Drawing on 30 years of experience as a human rights lawyer in Australia and the UK, and as Appeals judge on the Special Court for Sierra Leone, his presentation will trace recent jurisprudence at the national, regional, and international level. Judge Robertson will discuss strategies for litigating human rights cases against corporations and former foreign government officials, obstacles that stand in the way of success, and future trends.
Aging with a Plan: How a Little Thought Today Can Vastly Improve Your Tomorrow
 
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Professor Sharona Hoffman Co-Director of the Law-Medicine Center Interview by Kristina Moore, '17 Associate Editor of the Case Western Reserve University Law Review In this video podcast, Professor Sharona Hoffman, a national health law expert and Co-Director of the Law-Medicine Center, discusses her book Aging with a Plan: How a Little Thought Today Can Vastly Improve Your Tomorrow. The book is a concise but comprehensive resource designed to help people who are middle aged and beyond plan for their own aging and for taking care of elderly loved ones.
The 1996 WIPO Copyright Treaties: 10 Years Later. Panel 3: The Database Protection Debate
 
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November 10, 2006 Presented by: Center for Law, Technology and the Arts Cosponsored by: the Frederick K Cox International Law Center Summary: Fifth Annual LTA Symposium Mark Davison, Professor and Associate Dean (Undergraduate Studies), Monash Law School, Monash University Marshall Leaffer, Distinguished Scholar in IP Law and University Fellow, Indiana University School of Law-Bloomington Guido Westkamp, Senior Lecturer in IP Law, Queen Mary, University of London In 1996, the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) adopted two treaties pertaining to copyrights in the digital age the Copyright Treaty, and the Performances and Phonograms Treaty. As a result, legislatures from signatory countries, including the U.S., adopted various revisions to their copyright legislation. In the U.S., this included the enactment of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act as well as attempts to draft legislation to protect proprietary interests in valuable commercial databases. This year marks the 10th anniversary of the treaties. The symposium will provide a 10-year retrospective on the legal and policy issues underlying the adoption of the treaties and the ramifications of the implementation of relevant treaty provisions into local law. The symposium will include speakers from the U.S. and various other jurisdictions to compare legislative and judicial approaches to a number of issues arising under the WIPO treaties.
Trying the Trial and Lawyer Misconduct
 
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Faculty View from CWRU "Trying the Trial and Lawyer Misconduct" Andrew S. Pollis, Associate Professor in the Civil Litigation Clinic Interviewed by Ameera Haider - Class of 2016, ABA Moot Court team In his recent paper in the George Washington Law Review, Professor Andrew Pollis details three categories of attorney misconduct in litigation bad behavior among lawyers. Drawing upon real examples, including an Ohio prosecutor who obtained death sentences against two defendants for a the misconduct of having two simultaneous guilty-verdict murder only one of them could have committed trials in Ohio for the same crime, Pollis argues that juries should hear evidence of the misconduct be involved to discourage prevent further egregious behavior and to promote more-accurate fact finding.
Know Your Rights: Can You Record Police Officers Doing Their Job?
 
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Know Your Rights: Can You Record Police Officers Doing Their Job?
Signifiers in Cyberspace: Domain Names and Online Trademarks (3)
 
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November 13, 2009 Lunch Lecture: "Dispute Resolution under the Uniform Domain Name Dispute Resolution Policy" Speaker: Jeffrey Samuels, David L. Brennan Professor of Law; Director, Center for Intellectual Property Law and Technology; University of Akron School of Law Speaker introduction: Professor Jacqueline Lipton, Case Western Reserve University School of Law
Not in Front of the Children: Civil Liberties and Internet Censorship
 
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March 19, 2009 Speaker: Chris Hansen, Senior National Staff Counsel American Civil Liberties Union Presented by: Center for Law, Technology & the Arts Summary: Imagine not being able to read the latest on Salon.com, express yourself on websites like UrbanDictionary.com, or get information on sexual health. In 2000, the ACLU challenged the Child Online Protection Act (COPA), a piece of legislation making it illegal to distribute content on the Internet acknowledged as protected speech for adults but deemed harmful to minors, including the web content mentioned above. If implemented, COPA would have imposed harsh criminal sanctions, such as huge fines and prison time. In January 2009, the U.S. Supreme Court announced that it will not hear the governments appeal of COPA, officially ending the 10-year legal battle. In his talk, Chris Hansen will share his experience challenging COPA and other Internet censorship efforts.
Lawfare: Historical and Semiotic Origins of "Lawfare" (Panel 1)
 
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September 10, 2010 War Crimes Research Symposium Frederick K. Cox International Law Center Case Western Reserve University School of Law Moderator: Prof. Tawia Ansah, Visiting Professor, Case Western Reserve University School of Law Speakers: Prof. Wouter Werner, VU University, Amsterdam Prof. Susan Tiefenbrun, Thomas Jefferson School of Law Summary: Traditionally "Lawfare" was defined as "a strategy of using—or misusing—law as a substitute for traditional military means to achieve an operational objective." But lately, commentators and governments have applied the concept to International Criminal Tribunals, the defense counsel's tactics challenging the detention of al Qaeda suspects in Guantanamo Bay, and as indicated in the quote above to the controversial Goldstone Commission Report. This symposium and Experts Meeting, featuring two-dozen leading academics, practitioners, and former government officials from all sides of the political spectrum, will examine the usefulness and appropriate application of the "Lawfare" concept.
Business Law and Regulation in the Roberts Court - Pleading Standards
 
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September 17, 2010 "Business Law and Regulation in the Roberts Court" Case Western Reserve University School of Law Center for Business Law and Regulation Symposium Cleveland, Ohio