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How Does a Trust Work?
 
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A trust may not be right for everyone, but they may play a key role in proper estate planning! http://www.boonewealth.com A lot of people think trusts are only for the super wealthy -- not true. Trusts can benefit anyone who wants to manage how they leave their money to their family. A trust can give you control over who gets what, and when, how they get it, and why. How do trusts work? Trusts are like containers you can put things in to. You, the grantor, can place assets - like your house, life insurance policies, investments, and other possessions - into a trust. These assets become property of the trust, and are managed by your trustee. You appoint the trustee to ensure your wishes are carried out. As grantor, you decide who receives the assets inside your trust. Typically, your spouse, your children, grandchildren, and charities of your choice are the beneficiaries who receive the assets held in trust. When you create a trust, you determine how the funds inside your trust will be used, and when they will be dispersed. For example, you may want to use assets in your trust to jump-start your children's careers when they're 25. Or supplement their retirement when they turn 60. Or pay college tuition expenses for your grandchildren. Or provide annual scholarships to your alma mater. Your appointed trustee ensures everything is managed according to your instructions. It's important to know there are different kinds of trusts for different purposes. Some are designed to manage who receives your assets, and when. Others may offer tax planning benefits. Make sure you work with financial experts, so that your trusts are properly structured to carry out your specific intentions. Trusts can offer you and your family many financial advantages. Talk with your advisor and an estate planning attorney. Find out how trusts can help you create a lasting legacy for those you love the most.
Views: 70272 Boone Wealth Advisors
Introduction to Trusts Law
 
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At their heart trusts are simply a way of more than one person owning property. It has been suggested that they originate from knights who went on crusades in the 12th century. Within a trust there is a settlor who commences the trust and originally has absolute ownership. Ownership then splits between a trustee who takes legal title and a beneficiary who takes an equitable interest. There are three different types of trust: express, resulting and constructive trusts. Express trusts are set out in agreements. Resulting trusts are implied by the court where either the beneficiaries are not clearly defined by an agreement or where a contribution has been made towards the purchase price of property. Constructive trusts exist in order to prevent wrongdoing and abuse of the fiduciary duty. The different formats of a trust are bare trusts and fixed trusts (for a set number of beneficiaries) and discretionary trusts where the trustee has an active role in making decisions based on an uncertain future. Trusts are used in a variety of situations such as wills, in business and even for tax avoidance purposes. They have played a significant role in popular culture in books such as Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen, Bleak House by Charles Dickens and Pamela by Samuel Richardson.
Views: 19037 marcuscleaver
Trusts - Part 1 - the Trustee, the Settlor and the Beneficiary - white rabbit trust
 
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Watch the New Show: https://YouAndYourCash.Com To gain the most from our videos, please watch from start to finish; we trust you will be entertained. If we have included well known songs, by popular artists, and or clips from Hollywood blockbusters, please note that we do not own the copyright to said masterpieces. We’ve included them because love them, and encourage everyone to buy the tune/or DVD of the artist featured. This channel is not monetised, and we do not charge for promoting artistic genius. WhiteRabbitTrust and WhiteRabbitJediAcademy You-Tube Channels, should not be confused, with other Channels using the term ‘White Rabbit’. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=22K-EUnF9bM How Loans and Credit Cards Really Work https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HNephRl-0I0 The Wolf of Wall Street – It Doesn’t Exist https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ONB2gfnfHdk Challenge Your Mortgage Could You wipe up to 70% off Your Mortgage Debt? Watch This NOW, and PLEASE SHARE this link http://youandyourcash.com/cym https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SmfwPghjW_M The Hidden power of Attorney in Your Mortgage https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jwi5slYcITI How to Freeze Debt for 20 Years https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wmshUcovtHI Land Registry https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h7t8zXioAz4 The System doesn’t Exist – It’s all an Act Please subscribe to the: WhiteRabbitTrust (You Tube Channel), and the: YouAndYourCash (Your Tube Channel) and please encourage your friends and family to do likewise. Big love Spaniard x
Views: 42736 WhiteRabbitTrust
Trust Law - Introduction
 
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GET THE COMPLETE COURSE FOR $10! - https://goo.gl/9JHgRH If you wish to receive Private Tutoring: http://bit.ly/LawTutoring NEW! Kindle Book on Trust Law! - http://bit.ly/TrustLawKindle Recommended Reading: Q&A Equity and Trusts by Mohamed Ramjohn (Kindle Edition) - http://amzn.to/2jBNrt1 Q&A Equity and Trusts by Mohamed Ramjohn (Paperback Edition) - http://amzn.to/2jpbxbg The Law of Trusts by J E Penner - http://amzn.to/2ipTQK6 For complete courses, including Spider Graphs and Case Summaries, visit: English Legal System: http://www.udemy.com/learn-english-law/ Criminal Law: https://goo.gl/N1PM61 Contract Law: https://goo.gl/MBC7A8 Constitutional Law: https://goo.gl/wGcMuF Property Law: https://goo.gl/tGExGJ Tort Law: https://goo.gl/GAhG6p Trust Law: https://goo.gl/9JHgRH Jurisprudence: https://goo.gl/Ei2Ntv Commercial Law: https://goo.gl/r22QDr GET ALL COURSES FOR $50! https://goo.gl/9K5UXs Examination Techniques: ACE Constitutional Law: https://goo.gl/JiHNp7 ACE Contract Law: https://goo.gl/rp4Vh9 ACE Criminal Law: https://goo.gl/swxuCc ACE Tort Law: https://goo.gl/1BLVCe FACEBOOK: http://www.facebook.com/TheLawSimplified GOOGLE+: http://www.plus.google.com/+TheLawSimplified INSTAGRAM: http://www.instagram.com/thelawsimplified
Views: 13196 The Law Simplified
Revocable Trusts
 
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Robert discusses how to establish a revocable trust. Recorded: October 13, 2006
Trust Law - Types of Trusts (Part I)
 
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GET THE COMPLETE COURSE FOR $10! - https://goo.gl/9JHgRH If you wish to receive Private Tutoring: http://bit.ly/LawTutoring NEW! Kindle Book on Trust Law! - http://bit.ly/TrustLawKindle Recommended Reading: Q&A Equity and Trusts by Mohamed Ramjohn (Kindle Edition) - http://amzn.to/2jBNrt1 Q&A Equity and Trusts by Mohamed Ramjohn (Paperback Edition) - http://amzn.to/2jpbxbg The Law of Trusts by J E Penner - http://amzn.to/2ipTQK6 For complete courses, including Spider Graphs and Case Summaries, visit: English Legal System: http://www.udemy.com/learn-english-law/ Criminal Law: https://goo.gl/N1PM61 Contract Law: https://goo.gl/MBC7A8 Constitutional Law: https://goo.gl/wGcMuF Property Law: https://goo.gl/tGExGJ Tort Law: https://goo.gl/GAhG6p Trust Law: https://goo.gl/9JHgRH Jurisprudence: https://goo.gl/Ei2Ntv Commercial Law: https://goo.gl/r22QDr GET ALL COURSES FOR $50! https://goo.gl/9K5UXs Examination Techniques: ACE Constitutional Law: https://goo.gl/JiHNp7 ACE Contract Law: https://goo.gl/rp4Vh9 ACE Criminal Law: https://goo.gl/swxuCc ACE Tort Law: https://goo.gl/1BLVCe FACEBOOK: http://www.facebook.com/TheLawSimplified GOOGLE+: http://www.plus.google.com/+TheLawSimplified INSTAGRAM: http://www.instagram.com/thelawsimplified
Views: 18652 The Law Simplified
Equity & Trusts - Resulting Trusts
 
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The term resulting trusts comes from the Latin term "resalire" meaning to jump back and we will see how this applies to property. In Westdeutsche Landesbank v Islington LBC [1996] Lord Browne-Wilkinson identified two examples of resulting trusts: 1) Where a settlor attempts to create a trust for an unknown beneficiary and the property results back because equity abhors a vacuum. 2) Where individuals contribute to the purchase price of property. The best way to categorise resulting trusts was derived from Megarry VC in Re. Vandervell (No. 2) [1974]. Where a trust fails the equitable interest results back to the settlor and this covers automatic resulting trusts. A trust may fail for uncertainty of objects but also because of a condition precedent or condition subsequent. Surplus property is also subject to a resulting trust (Re. Trusts of the Abbott Fund [1900]) although there are exceptions in the following areas: For charitable trusts the property is applied cy-pres Beneficiary claim under Saunders v Vautier [1841] Property is distributed amongst members of unincorporated associations; Re. Bucks Constabulary Benevolent Fund [1978] Another form of resulting trusts are Quistclose trusts under Barclays Bank Ltd v Quistclose Investments Ltd [1970] whereby loan money intended for a certain purpose exists as a resulting trust. Presumed resulting trusts allow property to be transferred where there are certain relationships identified by case law. Voluntary gifts are also subject to presumed resulting trusts (Re Vinogradoff [1935]) although land is more suited towards constructive trusts (Hodgson v Marks [1971]). This category also covers contributions to the purchase price of property or to a mortgage (Lloyds Bank v Rosset [1990]) but the money must be directed towards acquisition (Winkworth v Edward Barron [1987]). The presumption in these cases can be rebutted by examining things like the factual circumstances to discover intention (Young v Sealey [1949]). Resulting trusts may also be found to exist where attempts are made a tax avoidance (Sekhon v Alissa [1989]). It is illegal to transfer property to avoid tax and generally the presence of illegality would have precluded a resulting trust (Gascoigne v Gascoigne [1918]) before Patel v Mirza [2016] that looks more towards public policy before coming to a decision on whether a resulting trust can be used. s. 423 Insolvency Act 1986 is also another important weapon at the disposal of the courts. In cases of mistake a resulting trust can be instituted where the transferee knew of the mistake; El Ajou v Dollar Land Holdings [1993].
Views: 1983 marcuscleaver
How trusts can help to protect family assets
 
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Tim Bennett explains the basics of trusts and how they can help with intergenerational wealth planning.
Views: 1714 Killik & Co
Three Types Of Trusts
 
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A brief White Board Animation explaining 3 different types of Trusts.
Views: 9268 Wendy Goidel
Using Irrevocable Trusts to Protect your Assets
 
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Using Irrevocable Trusts to Protect your Assets
Trusts Law: Classification of Trusts in 8mins
 
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This video is about Classification of Trusts. Both express (fixed & discretionary) and non-express/implied/imputed (resulting and constructive) trusts are explored. Particular detail to remedial & institutional constructive trusts and automatic & presumed resulting trusts are made. For written notes please visit www.komillachadha.com.
Views: 21518 Komilla Chadha
Family Trusts Made Simple
 
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Learn more about the benefits of Monarch Tax Law Trusts!
Views: 8866 Liz Young
How are Revocable and Irrevocable Trusts Taxed?
 
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For more information, please visit us at: http://www.kaidenelderlaw.com. This educational video about the taxation of Revocable and Irrevocable Trusts was produced by California estate planning & elder law attorney Randall F. Kaiden. Most of time when Trusts are discussed people talk about Estate & Gift Taxes. But what about plain vanilla trust income taxes? In this video, we explore trust income taxes. Randall F. Kaiden, founding attorney at Kaiden Elder Law Group, PC (and The Trust Store-our online portal), was born and raised in Los Angeles. In 1998, he began working in tax, estate planning and probate law. Soon thereafter, he added Medi-Cal & Veterans Planning to his practice. Since that time, he has been VA Accredited to represent claimants before the Department of Veteran's Affairs. He is a member of Elder Counsel, Wealth Counsel and the National Academy of Elder Law Attorneys. His practice is elder-centered, helping people respond to the challenges associated with chronic illness or disability as well as focusing on asset preservation, probate avoidance, tax reduction, trusts and estates. Attorney: Randall Kaiden, Esq. Contact: http://www.kaidenelderlaw.com These online videos and reading materials were prepared by Randall F. Kaiden, Esq. and for informational purposes only. They therefore DO NOT CONSTITUTE LEGAL ADVICE OR SERVICES. Watching and reading the information contained here is not intended to create an attorney-client relationship. Do not rely upon any information you receive here for any purpose without seeking independent legal advice from a licensed attorney in your State. The information provided here is very general and may or may not reflect the most current law. Thus, the information contained here is not promised or guaranteed to be correct or complete. Nothing contained on this website or retransmitted on any other is intended to be used or relied on, by any taxpayer for the purpose of avoiding penalties that may be imposed on the taxpayer under the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended. TAXPAYERS MUST SEEK INDEPENDENT TAX LEGAL ADVISE FOR THEIR OWN PARTICULAR CIRCUMSTANCES, WITH RESPECT TO ANY TRANSACTION OR MATTER CONTAINED HEREIN. Randall F. Kaiden expressly disclaims all liability in respect to actions taken or not taken based on any and all of the information (in any format) provided here.
Views: 22615 Randall Kaiden
Real Estate Investment Trusts for Dummies
 
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https://www.commercialpropertyadvisors.com/blog/ Learn the basics of Real Estate Investment Trusts (REITs), how to invest in them, the benefits as well as the disadvantages, are they right for you and perhaps most importantly, would it be better to invest in commercial real estate on your own versus in a REIT.
MCITP 70-640: Active Directory Trusts
 
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Trusts in Active Directory create the pathways for authentication to occur. They are used to link Active Directory domains to each other and also link Active Directory domains to non Microsoft systems. Demonstration 08:56 In order to share resources between two domains, there must a trust or trusts connecting the two domains. Trusts do not provide access they only create a pathway to the destination. Think of trusts like roads: if you need to get to a house and there is a road between you and the house, you can drive to the destination. If the house is locked you won't be able get in unless you have the key. The same applies with trusts: you need the path to the resource via a trust and permission to access the resource. Trust direction (One-way or two) Trusts can be one-way or two-way. If the trust is two-way, then the domain on either side can access the other side. If the trust is one-way, the terminology used to describe the trust will usually be "Domain A trusts domain B." This means that domain A is the trusting domain and domain B will be the trusted domain. For a user in a certain domain to access a resource in another domain, the user needs to be in the trusted domain. Transitive trusts A transitive trust is when a trust can be extended outside of the two domains in which it was created. A domain connected via a transitive trust can thus access any other domain when there is a path of transitive trusts between that domain and the target domain. Non-transitive trust A non-transitive trust is a trust that will not extend past the domains it was created with. If domain A was connected to domain B and domain B connected to domain C using non-transitive trusts the following would occur. Domain A and domain B would be able to access each other. Domain B could access domain C. Domain A, however, could not access domain C. Even though the domains are indirectly connected, since the trust is non-transitive the connection will stop once it gets to domain B. In order for domain A and domain C to communicate using non-transitive trust you would need to create another trust between domain A and domain C. Think of it like having to catch two buses to get to your destination but only having one bus ticket. Transitive and non-transitive trusts will work together. When using both, the pathway through the network will simply stop as soon as a non-transitive trust is travelled over. Due to a limit on the description size on YouTube, please see the following for the rest of the description: http://itfreetraining.com/70-640/active-directory-trusts See http://YouTube.com/ITFreeTraining or http://itfreetraining.com for our always free training videos. This is only one video from the many free courses available on YouTube.
Views: 97074 itfreetraining
What Is a Trust? | Financial Terms
 
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Watch more How to Understand Personal Finance Terms videos: http://www.howcast.com/videos/491791-What-Is-a-Trust-Financial-Terms A trust is a legal document that a lot of people set up for estate planning purposes. And in general there are two types of trusts that people can set up. What's called a revocable living trust. And revocable meaning you can change the terms anytime you want. And living trust it's set up while you are alive or there are what's called irrevocable trust. And irrevocable trust once they're set up and funded usually are very difficult or if not impossible to change. So that is why would someone set up a trust from an estate planning perspective. Usually for a few direct reasons. I mean first when you set up a trust, any assets that are inside that trust can be managed in a specific way. Whether you got sick, whether you passed away, your wishes in regards to those assets are being managed, and you've outlined all the ways that you want that money to be managed going forward. So somebody is looking at that reading that trust document and using that as their guide. Any assets that are in a trust bypass the court probate process when someone dies. That's something you can't do with a basic will. And so they provide an element of ease and transition when someone passes away. And they keep the settlement of the estate very private. That's another important goal that a lot of people have. A third reason people might set up trusts from an estate planning stand point is to try and to receive some type of tax benefit. And there are a lot of different types of trust and a lot of different types of tax benefits that you may get. Either from income tax or from a state tax. But that's a third reason that someone might set up a trust. Now you are watching hear, does everyone need to set up a trust? The answer to that is no. But as the amount of assets you have increases and the complexity of your situation increases then it is must more likely that you would need a trust. As far as getting a trust in most cases I would recommend that you go out and seek an estate planning attorney to draft a trust. Usually when you are dealing with something that's complicated it is probably better to get professional guidance on it rather than trying doing it on their own. Also, make sure you don't make this vital mistake because I have had a lot of high network clients. that go to an attorney they get a trust document drafted but they don't put the assets in name of the trust. And as a result the money that they spend and all that effort is worthless if the name of the account is not inside the trust. or if the house is not listed in the name of the trust. So make sure you do not make that mistake. Again a trust can be really good for a lot of people, but not everyone needs one. So you really need to review your entire estate plan to see if it is appropriate for your situation.
Views: 13884 Howcast
When a Chameleon trusts you :)
 
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If you chameleon correctly, this is the kind of bond you can have with your little fellas. These guides were invaluable in learning how to Chameleon, as Teemo was my first little guy and I had no idea what I was doing at first lol. The BIGGEST issues I was having was humidity control, and spending $15 a week on crickets (not including gas and time to go get them) was about to be a deal breaker. Fortunately, a friend pointed me in the direction of a breeding guide. HOLY MOLY did it save me a load of money, and time. Basically, 5 minute of maintenance a month and you have unlimited crickets! https://tinyurl.com/y6v5n5jm - Chameleon Guide http://tinyurl.com/yca27e9p - Cricket Breeding Guide Edit: 10/4/2017 ----- This video blew up. I figured I might as well give yall a little background here. I rescued this little guy from a friend who was in dire need of some cash back in 2014. He shipped him from Virginia to Kansas (Where I'm at). He was 4 months old and still a tiny little thing back then. He was my first Chameleon, and boy was I in for a treat / second job. I named him Teemo, after one of my favorite characters in League of Legends (also because he can be invisible like the character, and drops little turd shrooms like the character haha). I took this video and meant to send it through text to my friend, but it was too big! So I uploaded it to Youtube and forgot about it for two years. All of a sudden, YOU GUYS FOUND ME. And, Yall have spent 2.93 years // 1070 days // 25,673 Hours // 1,540,405 minutes watching this video xD Some FAQ: Q: How did you tame this guy? A: Uhh, I really didn't know anything about them, so after searching around on google for a while, I found a guide (linked above) which literally covered everything. I bonded emotionally with him. I let him have lots of freedom. etc. Just check out the guide if you currently own one or are set on getting one. Q: Why no more chameleon videos? A: Well, after a 4 month battle with an eye infection, Teemo passed away. $1400 vet visits later I was giving him a daily shot in his leg muscle for it, but it never got better. This was one of the worst days of my life. Q: Why haven't you gotten another one? A: Well, I literally have a giant tattoo of Teemo on my chest to immortalize the ridiculously cool experience I had with this animal. Chameleons just aren't supposed to act like he did, and I didn't necessarily want to try again and be disappointed, and then not give the animal the love and affection I gave Teemo. Also, my job is killing me. Someone hire me. LOL
Views: 14330001 Taylor Shawn
Why do we like investment trusts? - MoneyWeek Investment Tutorials
 
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At MoneyWeek we like investment trusts. Tim Bennett explains what it is that sets it apart from other investment vehicles, specifically unit trusts and exchange traded funds. Don't miss out on Tim Bennett's video tutorials -- get the latest video sent straight to your inbox each week, before it's released on YouTube: http://bit.ly/TimBSubscribe To receive Tim's 50 FREE MoneyWeek Basics emails: http://bit.ly/mwk-basics Watch over 100 of Tim's videos for free: http://MoneyWeek.com/tutorials Or download them to your mobile device: http://bit.ly/TimBpodcast For the most important financial stories and how to profit from them: http://MoneyWeek.com http://Facebook.com/pages/MoneyWeek/110326662354766 http://Twitter.com/moneyweek Video series by CFA UK Highly Commended journalist Tim Bennett. http://twitter.com/TimMoneyweek
Views: 25214 moneycontent
Trusts 101 - Estate Planning With Trusts
 
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Learn the basics about trusts and how they are used in estate planning. What is a trust? What type of trust do you need? Watch and learn here. NOTE: NOT LEGAL ADVICE! For informational purposes only. Contact our office at (248)278-1511 if you would like legal advice specific to your situation.
10 Types of Trusts
 
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Stapleton Law Firm
Views: 4051 Stapleton Elder Law
Equity & Trusts - Charities
 
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Charities are an interesting area of study because they bridge the gap between the private and public sector, providing help and assistance to those less well off. Nevertheless this also means that charities need to be accountable and so there is a legislative regime around charities that includes the Charities Act 2011, case law and the Charity Commission. The charitable trust must be exclusively charitable and so in Blair v Duncan [1902] the phrase "charitable or other purpose" was not allowed to stand. However the courts do take a broad and generous approach in this area as seen in Guild v IRC [1992] where there was an attempt to look at the intention of the charitable trust. Charities, however, are not allowed to be political and the most famous case in this particular area is National Anti-Vivisection Society v IRC [1940] where it was found that an organisation attempting to change the law could not be charitable in nature. Nevertheless the courts again will take a wider view and look to an overall intention as can be seen with the RSPCA, Greenpeace and other major charities with a national profile. Charities law has its origin in the Poor Law 1530 and the Statute of Elizabeth I 1601 but the modern formulation comes from Pemsel's case. In the case of Pensel (1891) Lord McNaughten set out four charitable purposes: Relief of poverty Advancement of education Advancement of religion Other purposes beneficial to the community This formulation is carried into the modern law with the fourth category being fleshed out in first the Charities Act 2006 and then in the consolidated Charities Act 2011. When investigating charities there are two key ingredients to look for: A charitable purpose under s. 3(1) Charities Act 2011 A public benefit under s. 4 Charities Act 2011 (including case law) The first purpose under s. 3(1)(a) is the prevention or relief of poverty and poverty is given a general definition rather than anything scientific or precise. In Re Coulthurst’s WT [1951] the idea of 'going short' was floated. As per Dingle v Turner [1972] even if there is a connection between the charity and the person receiving the property this will still be allowed if there is a genuine charitable intention. This fact also means that there is no public benefit requirement under this heading and charities can be set up to help poor relatives (Re Scarisbrick [1951]). Just because a charity has been set up this does not mean they are not allowed to pay employees or charge for services (Re Cottam [1955]), charge rent for accommodation (Re Estlin [1903]) or trade (ICLR v A-G [1972]). S. 3(1)(b) concerns the advancement of education and again this is given a broad definition that goes beyond schools, colleges and universities. According to Slade J in McGovern v A-G [1982] research is charitable if: The subject matter is worthy of study The knowledge will be made publicly available There is a public benefit Research cannot be politically motivated as per Re Shaw [1958] although questions could also be asked about the value of the research in Re Hopkins [1965]. For sports and education there normally has to be a link between the sport and a given education establishment (IRC v McMullen [1981]). For the public benefit test it is important to look behind the charitable trust to the de facto situation. In IRC v Educational Grants Association [1967] a trust that only benefited employees of a certain company was not considered to be for the public benefit. S. 3(1)(c) concerns the advancement of religion and the definition of religion has been expanded over time and now includes polytheism and religions where there is no God. This raises the question as to how religion should be defined and it is suggested that there should be some sort of belief in the supernatural and a code of conduct as to how to live your life. The religion should also be sufficiently serious. Praying does not count as a public benefit because this has to be tangible although it is questionable how useful some of the public benefits are in cases such as Thornton v Howe [1862]. The other categories are: (d) the advancement of health or the saving of lives; (e) the advancement of citizenship or community development; (f)the advancement of the arts, culture, heritage or science; (g) the advancement of amateur sport; (h) the advancement of human rights, conflict resolution or reconciliation or the promotion of religious or racial harmony or equality and diversity (i) the advancement of environmental protection or improvement; (j) the relief of those in need because of youth, age, ill-health, disability, financial hardship or other disadvantage (k) the advancement of animal welfare (l) the promotion of the efficiency of the armed forces of the Crown or of the efficiency of the police, fire and rescue services or ambulance services The Charity Commission is responsible for deciding on genuine charitable purposes and for holding charities to account.
Views: 7986 marcuscleaver
Trust Law - Public Purpose Trusts
 
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GET THE COMPLETE COURSE FOR $10! - https://goo.gl/9JHgRH If you wish to receive Private Tutoring: http://bit.ly/LawTutoring NEW! Kindle Book on Trust Law! - http://bit.ly/TrustLawKindle Recommended Reading: Q&A Equity and Trusts by Mohamed Ramjohn (Kindle Edition) - http://amzn.to/2jBNrt1 Q&A Equity and Trusts by Mohamed Ramjohn (Paperback Edition) - http://amzn.to/2jpbxbg The Law of Trusts by J E Penner - http://amzn.to/2ipTQK6 For complete courses, including Spider Graphs and Case Summaries, visit: English Legal System: http://www.udemy.com/learn-english-law/ Criminal Law: https://goo.gl/N1PM61 Contract Law: https://goo.gl/MBC7A8 Constitutional Law: https://goo.gl/wGcMuF Property Law: https://goo.gl/tGExGJ Tort Law: https://goo.gl/GAhG6p Trust Law: https://goo.gl/9JHgRH Jurisprudence: https://goo.gl/Ei2Ntv Commercial Law: https://goo.gl/r22QDr GET ALL COURSES FOR $50! https://goo.gl/9K5UXs Examination Techniques: ACE Constitutional Law: https://goo.gl/JiHNp7 ACE Contract Law: https://goo.gl/rp4Vh9 ACE Criminal Law: https://goo.gl/swxuCc ACE Tort Law: https://goo.gl/1BLVCe FACEBOOK: http://www.facebook.com/TheLawSimplified GOOGLE+: http://www.plus.google.com/+TheLawSimplified INSTAGRAM: http://www.instagram.com/thelawsimplified
Views: 3656 The Law Simplified
Secret Trusts
 
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'Secret Trusts'Sample FE1 Law Lecture Comp 4 by Philip Burke City Colleges
Views: 21534 City Colleges
Wills, Trusts & Estate Planning Fundamentals
 
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Here are some key concepts to prepare you for our Estate Planning conversation. www.LawEsq.net 732-521-9455
Video: Guide to Investing Series: Part 1: An Intro to Unit Trusts
 
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Learn about investing with our easy-to-understand series, "A Guide to Investing". In this first video, we provide an introduction to Unit Trusts. What is a Unit Trust? Simply put, a unit trust, also known as a fund, is a way for you to invest your money. It allows a group of investors to combine their cash and invest it in various assets and financial markets. It’s a bit like going in together on a group gift. Find out: How they work Who should invest in them Why Prudential Unit Trusts Visit www.prudential.co.za to find a fund that works consistently for you.
Views: 3806 Prudential
Chapter 14 Income Taxation of Trusts & Estates
 
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Chapter 14 Income Taxation of Trusts & Estates
Views: 4215 Bonnie Hammer
Ultimate Guide to Gun Trusts - The Legal Brief!
 
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We get asked all the time about gun trusts. So what's the deal? Do you actually need one? ♦ TGC PATREON: https://www.patreon.com/TheGunCollective ♦ ★ Buy From Amazon! ► http://amzn.to/2kE8UBq ★ Top TGC Gear ► https://www.amazon.com/shop/theguncollective ★★ GET GEAR AT DEALER COST - https://lddy.no/40uq ★★ ★♦★ Sponsors, Partners, Discounts and Promos: https://goo.gl/gTmnEY ★♦★ ✮✮✮ Subscribe here: https://goo.gl/LatffH ✮✮✮ Today's Partners: • Get 10% off at KDG w/code TGC10 - http://goo.gl/rZGJif • Visit Patriot Patch Co. - http://goo.gl/djQ2ld ———————— SOCIAL LINKS ———————— FACEBOOK: http://goo.gl/x9bz8T INSTAGRAM: http://goo.gl/sCIN86 TWITTER: http://goo.gl/3q4qoN Business Inquires: info@pattonmediaconsulting.com ©Patton Media and Consulting, LLC 2018 The materials available through The Gun Collective (including any show, episode, guest appearance, etc. appearing within) are for informational and entertainment purposes only. The opinions expressed through this video are the opinions of the individual author.
Views: 21872 TheGunCollective
Lecture on Resulting Trusts in english law, Part 1 of 4
 
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This is a lecture delivered by Mary Lee. Mary is a Equity and Trust lecturer at the University of Sussex.
Views: 765 Lotus Lotus
BUYING INVESTMENT PROPERTIES IN TRUSTS VS PERSONAL NAMES… THE GOOD, THE BAD, AND THE UGLY!
 
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SPECIAL FREE BONUS – For Instant FREE Access to The 10 Hour Real Estate Fast Track Weekend Online Video Home Study Valued At $497.00! -http://www.realestatedvd.com.au/absolutely-free-access-2016/ LIVE EVENT FREE TICKETS – For FREE tickets to attend the next live Melbourne educational event – The Real Estate Investing Fast Track Weekend - http://www.realestatefasttrack.com.au/?utm_source=Youtube Watch Steven Molnar from Investors Prime and Expert Guest Speaker Matienne Angelique from Savvi Accounting for an exclusive 1.5 hour live Webinar where you will discover the advantages and disadvantages of buying investment properties in trusts compared to your personal name. More specifically Martienne will cover the implications of using trusts with regards to Negative Gearing, Land Tax, Capital Gains Tax, and Asset Protection. The implications of setting up these structures correctly for property investors are very substantial and getting this one part of your overall investment strategy wrong could set you back tens of thousands and in some cases hundreds of thousands of dollars payable in tax, and wipe years off your investment time line horizon...in fact, incorrectly structuring your Property Portfolio could even cost you double the amount of tax. This Webinar will teach you the critical things you need to know to structure your assets for protection and maximum profit, so reserve your place right now! Martienne Angelique is a Chartered Accountant with more than 20 years'...of technical taxation, accounting structuring and advising experience. She is a Visionary, Entrepreneur, Speaker, published Author, Property and Wealth Creation Specialist and an Asset Protection and Structuring Expert. Her passion for property and wealth creation began at a young age, buying her first property when just 20 years old. Martienne founded the Savvi Group which is a leading edge business paving the way to a new approach to serving clients. The business offers a comprehensive range of services to allow clients to build their financial success through a full spectrum of financial services and expertise to PLAN & BUILD & PROTECT their wealth and success. Martienne has a unique ability to inspire others to achieve success, and with her specialised skills coupled with her passion for property means she has an excellent base for advising on Advanced Wealth Creation strategies. For dates and venues to the latest Real Estate Investing Fast Track Weekend Live Event go to; http://www.realestatefasttrack.com.au/?utm_source=Youtube To access the latest projects offered by Investors Prime Real Estate go to; http://www.investorsprime.com.au For further education on how to build and structure a Multi-Million Dollar Property Portfolio from Scratch go to;http://www.RealEstateDVD.com.au To keep up to date with the latest videos, blogs, eBooks, from Konrad Bobilak go to; http://www.konradbobilak.com.au
Wills Versus Living Trusts
 
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Learn the Difference Between a Will and a Living Trust - Video by Estate Planning Attorney Steven W. Allen
Views: 56100 thejon76
Why we like investment trusts - MoneyWeek Investment Tutorials
 
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Here at MoneyWeek we like investment trusts, Tim Bennett explains what it is that sets it apart from other investment vehicles, specifically unit trusts and exchange traded funds. Don't miss out on Tim Bennett's video tutorials -- get the latest video sent straight to your inbox each week, before it's released on YouTube: http://bit.ly/TimBSubscribe To receive Tim's 50 FREE MoneyWeek Basics emails: http://bit.ly/mwk-basics Watch over 100 of Tim's videos for free: http://MoneyWeek.com/tutorials Or download them to your mobile device: http://bit.ly/TimBpodcast For the most important financial stories and how to profit from them: http://MoneyWeek.com http://Facebook.com/pages/MoneyWeek/110326662354766 http://Twitter.com/moneyweek Video series by CFA UK Highly Commended journalist Tim Bennett. http://twitter.com/TimMoneyweek
Views: 9945 MoneyWeek
Equity & Trusts - Formalities of Creating an Express Trust
 
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The general principle of creating an express trust comes from Turner LJ in Milroy v Lord [1862] where it was stated that there must be a valid declaration of trust and also that the legal title must pass to the trustee. Another general principle is that the settlor must have a proprietary right in the property they are establishing a trust over as per Windeyer J in Norman v Federal Commissioner of Taxation [1963]. A person also cannot create a trust over property they will have a proprietary interest in in the future as per Re Brooks’ ST [1939]. There is an exception to this principle in cases of estoppel. Once a trust has been created it cannot be undone by a settlor as per Paul v Paul [1882]. However the power to revoke a trust can be included in the trust instrument though this itself has tax implications. On the other hand beneficiaries can both enforce and revoke a trust as per Saunders v Vautier [1841]. In more specific examples a trust over personal property requires no formalities (M’Fadden v Jenkyns [1842]). This means they can be created orally (Paul v Constance [1977]) or even inferred by the courts (Re Kayford [1975]). The only exception is for shares that do have to be registered in the name of the trustee. Trusts over land are normally created by way of a deed but in general they have to be completed in writing and signed by the settlor as per s. 53(1)(b) of the Law of Property Act 1925. All of the terms of the contract have to be included in one document as per s. 2 of the Law of Property (Miscellaneous Provisions) Act 1989. Trusts of land are governed by the Trusts of Land and Appointment of Trustees Act 1996. Under s. 9 of the Wills Act 1837 a Will must be: in writing signed by the testator signed/attested by two or more witnesses An important exception from s. 53(2) of the Law of Property Act 1925 is that resulting, implied and constructive trusts do not require formalities. The courts may also allow exceptions in cases of fraud or unconscionability (Rochefoucauld v Boustead [1897]).
Views: 6993 marcuscleaver
Trust Trailer Season 1 (2018) FX Series
 
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Trust Trailer Season 1 - 2018 FX Series Subscribe: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=serientrailermp Folgt uns bei Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/SerienBeiMoviepilot About Trust: Rome, 1973. John Paul Getty III, the heir and younger member of an oil tycoons' saga, is kidnapped by the Italian mafia in order to get a ransom. Quite surprisingly, for some undisclosed reason, his family seems not inteterested at all in having him back.
Views: 321595 Series Trailer MP
What is a Family Trust? Do I Need A Family Trust?  - ASK CIB All About Accounting
 
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What is a Family Trust? Do I Need A Family Trust? - ASK CIB All About Accounting Hi, my name is Joel and I’m an accountant at CIB Accountants. In this video I’ll be talking about family trusts, who might use them and some of the advantages and disadvantages of having a trust. This video is part of the ask CIB series. By the end of this video I you will have a better idea of whether a family trust may be of use to you. So, what is a family trust? A family trust is a way of holding assets on behalf of someone else. In some ways it is similar to a parent opening a bank account for a young child. The money in the account belongs to the child but the parent controls and looks after that money. In a similar way a family trust assets in a trust are controlled by a trustee. If you set up a trust you can decide who the trustee is. For example the trustee could be you or a company you control. The trustee is the one that looks after those assets on behalf of what’s called the beneficiaries of the trust. The beneficiaries of the trust are the people who are entitled to receive the income and the assets of the trust. The beneficiaries of the trust are usually members of a particular family as well as other companies and trusts controlled by that family. So why might one use a family trust? A family trust has a number of advantages, one of those is asset protection. Many businesses owners face a degree of risk, for example if their business fails they may be sued personally or be at risk of bankruptcy. Similarly those in partnerships, particularly with bank debt can face similar risks. In these situations assets in the name of the business owner may need to be sold to satisfy these claims. Whereas if assets are in a family trust, in most cases these assets can be protected from creditors. Another benefit of having a family trust is that it allows income to be shared among the family which then may reduce tax. So it can actually be quite a good mechanism for reducing tax in a family group. So for example if you just hold an asset in your name and you might have to pay tax at the top rate which is currently 49%. However if you have a family trust you might have an adult child in university, your spouse might not be working, you might be able to share some of that tax burden using your family trust to reduce the overall amount of tax that can be paid. Well one of the disadvantages is if you have a tax loss then that tax loss can’t go out to individuals such as Mum and Dad. For example if you have an investment property in the trust, its negatively geared and makes a loss then Mum and Dad can’t offset that loss against their own income but rather gets stuck in the trust until future years to be offset against other income that the trust may generate. Another disadvantage of a family trust is that there is no NSW Land Tax free threshold. That means that if you buy a property in NSW you’ll be paying land tax from the first dollar, whereas if you for example buy the property in an individual’s name then you’ll get a land tax free threshold $432,000 in the 2015 year. Another disadvantage of a family trust is that it can be difficult to plan what happens with the assets in a trust after your death. Typically with a will you would say what assets you want to go to who. A family trust is outside of an individuals will, so although you can select who controls the family trust after your death you can’t then specify what those people do after your death, so the controller after your death ultimately can decide what they want to do with the trust. So that’s an overview of family trusts with some of the advantages and disadvantages. Family trusts can be an excellent mechanism for family group to protect their assets and save tax however it is always important to get advice in before setting up a family trust. If you would like to talk to someone about using Xero in your business please contact us at CIB Accountants. If you would like additional tips or ideas for your business please subscribe to our channel or send us an email via ask@cibaccountants.com.au . Alternatively tweet to us using the hash tag #askCIB. Thank you. website: http://askcibaccountants.com.au twitter: http://twitter.com/askcib
Views: 12667 CIB Accountants
Trust Law - Express Trusts: Constitution
 
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GET THE COMPLETE COURSE FOR $10! - https://goo.gl/9JHgRH If you wish to receive Private Tutoring: http://bit.ly/LawTutoring NEW! Kindle Book on Trust Law! - http://bit.ly/TrustLawKindle Recommended Reading: Q&A Equity and Trusts by Mohamed Ramjohn (Kindle Edition) - http://amzn.to/2jBNrt1 Q&A Equity and Trusts by Mohamed Ramjohn (Paperback Edition) - http://amzn.to/2jpbxbg The Law of Trusts by J E Penner - http://amzn.to/2ipTQK6 For complete courses, including Spider Graphs and Case Summaries, visit: English Legal System: http://www.udemy.com/learn-english-law/ Criminal Law: https://goo.gl/N1PM61 Contract Law: https://goo.gl/MBC7A8 Constitutional Law: https://goo.gl/wGcMuF Property Law: https://goo.gl/tGExGJ Tort Law: https://goo.gl/GAhG6p Trust Law: https://goo.gl/9JHgRH Jurisprudence: https://goo.gl/Ei2Ntv Commercial Law: https://goo.gl/r22QDr GET ALL COURSES FOR $50! https://goo.gl/9K5UXs Examination Techniques: ACE Constitutional Law: https://goo.gl/JiHNp7 ACE Contract Law: https://goo.gl/rp4Vh9 ACE Criminal Law: https://goo.gl/swxuCc ACE Tort Law: https://goo.gl/1BLVCe FACEBOOK: http://www.facebook.com/TheLawSimplified GOOGLE+: http://www.plus.google.com/+TheLawSimplified INSTAGRAM: http://www.instagram.com/thelawsimplified
Views: 6439 The Law Simplified
Discretionary Trusts new
 
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Description
Views: 5299 cosh5
How to Administer a Trust after Someone Has Died | Glendale Trusts Attorney
 
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http://bazikyanlaw.com/areas-of-pract... Estate Planning Attorney Probate Attorney Trust Administration Attorney Asset Protection Attorney With offices in both Glendale, California and Sherman Oaks, California. Contact us for a free consultation. Sherman Oaks Location 15300 Ventura Boulevard, Suite 305 Sherman Oaks, CA 91403 Glendale Location 240 S. Jackson Street Suite 310 Glendale, CA 91205 (818) 649-9110 Office (818) 945-0990 Fax Most believe that once they create a living trust and fund it with their assets, they are done and have nothing more to do. For the most part, this is true. The “decedent” or person that passed away has nothing more to do after creating and funding the trust. However, following their death, the person they have appointed as “trustee” (or person in charge of the trust) must “administer” the trust. Arminé Bazikyan 15300 Ventura Boulevard, Suite 305 Sherman Oaks, CA 91403 armine@bazikyanlaw.com www.bazikyanlaw.com (818) 649-9110 Office DISCLAIMER: Please be advised that the information contained in this website is for informational purposes only and is an attorney advertisement. The transmission or receipt of information to or from this website is not intended to create, and does not create an attorney-client relationship. Legal advice should be sought from competent legal counsel in your relevant jurisdiction. The testimonials throughout this site were provided by actual clients. To maintain their privacy their names have been abbreviated. Please note that testimonials do not warrant, guarantee or predict your particular results. Bazikyan Law Group, APC makes no warranty about the accuracy or reliability of the information on this site or other third party linked sites. Presence of third party links does not imply responsibility for the third party site or an endorsement of the linked site and its contents by Bazikyan Law Group, APC. U.S. tax advice within this website (including links to third party sites or material) is not intended to be used, and cannot be used, for purposes of (i) avoiding penalties imposed by the Internal Revenue Code, or (ii) promoting, marketing or recommending to another party any transaction or matter addressed herein. No portion of this site may be reproduced or used in any manner other than for the private information of the site reader without the express written consent of Bazikyan Law Group, APC.
Views: 4702 Armine Bazikyan
Wills Review: Wills, Trusts, and Estates Class
 
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This is a short review of wills for students in my wills, trusts, and estates class. The information provided in this video is for general educational purposes only and does not constitute legal advice. No attorney-client relationship is formed between me and the viewer. For specific advice regarding your situation, please consult a qualified attorney in your jurisdiction.
Trusts Review
 
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This is a short review of trusts for students in my wills, trusts, and estates class. The information provided in this video is for general educational purposes only and does not constitute legal advice. No attorney-client relationship is formed between me and the viewer. For specific advice regarding your situation, please consult a qualified attorney in your jurisdiction.
Taxability of Unregistered Religious & Charitable Trusts - CA. Pramod Jain
 
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Namaste, Taxability of receipt of corpus donations by Unregistered Religious & Charitable Trusts has assumed importance w.e.f. 1st April 2017 due to insertion of s. 56(2)(x). This video is important for all such unregistered schools, hospitals, mandirs, masjids, gurudwaras, sthanks, etc. This video would also be available on http://lunawat.com/ and free mobile app LUNAWAT ( Available on Play Store and App Store ) Regards CA. Pramod Jain
Views: 2737 CA. Pramod Jain
NFL Total Access Today 6/19/2018  - Jerry Jones trusts Ezekiel Elliott as much as he trusts himself
 
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Good Morning Football Today 6/19/2018 LIVE + NFL Total Access
Views: 1844 NFL Talk Show
Mutual Funds and Investment Trusts
 
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Funds pool money put in by lots of different people, and invest the money to give those people a return. Different types of funds invest in different asset classes. Most funds will try to hold a wide variety of investments in their portfolios, so that they avoid having too much exposure to any single investments.
Views: 9298 hubbis
Equity & Trusts - Three Certainties: Intention
 
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The three certainties for creating an express trust are intention, subject matter and objects. There has to be certainty of intention to create a trust and not some other type of instrument. For example a trust cannot be used to perfect an imperfect gift (Milroy v Lord [1862]). Secondly although a charge is quite similar to a trust they are distinct (Clough Mill v Martin [1984]). Bank accounts are not a trust relationship but instead a transfer of money to the bank (Foley v Hill [1848]). A person is also not allowed to set up a trust in order to avoid a liability. This is known as a sham device and a classic example was seen in Midland Bank v Wyatt [1995]. To distinguish between a trust and a sham device we have to "examine external evidence" and also look at the context as per Arden L.J. in Hitch v Stone [2001]. Courts can also infer the intention to create a trust by the words used or the actions of those involved. In Paul v Constance [1977] the phrase “the money is as much mine as it is yours” was sufficient while in Re. Kayford [1975] establishing a separate bank account was enough although this was disputed in Re. Farepak [2006]; a case that reached a different conclusion. The courts will not always readily infer a trust and in Tito v Waddell (No. 2) [1977] the word 'trust' was not sufficient. It is also necessary to distinguish between trusts and mere moral obligations. The phrase "in full confidence only imposed a moral obligation in Re. Adams & Kensington Vestry [1884] but in Comiskey v. Bowring-Hanbury [1905] the same phrase did create a trust because it created rights for other people. This question of rights is key and in Westdeutsche Landesbank Girozentrale v Islington London Borough Council [1996] the question 'Would it be unconscionable of the legal owner to deny others rights in the property?' was found to be useful. Finally in relation to wills and probate, certainty of intention is based on two factors: The wording of the Will (Re. Denley [1969]) The context of the trust’s creation
Views: 11827 marcuscleaver
Family trusts in Canada - WMCZ Lawyers
 
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Family trusts can be incredibly useful for succession and tax planning, but their features are tough to figure out. We'll discuss some of the basics.
Views: 1483 hipduf
Wills & Trusts
 
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Most people want to plan for what happens after they're gone. That's where wills and trusts come in.
Views: 1938 KCTS9
Equity & Trusts - Variation of Trusts
 
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The general rule is that once a trust is created it cannot be varied or deviated from unless this is allowed by the trust instrument itself as in Paul v Paul [1882]. However over the years a number of exceptions to this have merged such as for emergency situations in Re. New [1901] as well as the following: For the benefit of infants s. 53 Trustee Act 1925 Management or administration of property where ‘expedient’ s. 57 Trustee Act 1925 For the benefit of those suffering from mental health issues s. 96 Mental Health Act 1983 Divorce (pre- and post-nuptial agreements) s. 24(1)(c) & (d) Matrimonial Causes Act 1973 One of the main problems that arose with the variation of trusts was the decision in Chapman v Chapman [1954] which severely limited the range of exceptions. The Law Commission addressed this problem and in 1958 the Variation of Trusts Act received Royal Assent. This allowed for the courts to vary trusts in respect of certain groups of people: (a)any person having, directly or indirectly, an interest, whether vested or contingent, under the trusts who by reason of infancy or other incapacity is incapable of assenting, or (b)any person (whether ascertained or not) who may become entitled, directly or indirectly, to an interest under the trusts as being at a future date or on the happening of a future event a person of any specified description or a member of any specified class of persons, so however that this paragraph shall not include any person who would be of that description, or a member of that class, as the case may be, if the said date had fallen or the said event had happened at the date of the application to the court, or (c)any person unborn, or (d)any person in respect of any discretionary interest of his under protective trusts where the interest of the principal beneficiary has not failed or determined. The use of the word "arrangement" in section 1 also gives the courts a range of powers in respect of varying trusts but this does not extend to re-constituting or completely altering trusts as in Vandervell v IRC [1967]. Beneficiaries also have a right of veto under Goulding v James [1997]. The applicant them-self also cannot benefit from the variation as per Megarry J in Re. Holt's ST [1969]. This goes beyond financial benefit and can even include a moral benefit. As the variation is done by court order there is no need for other formalities such as writing or a deed. This principle was most clearly stated by Wynn-Parry J in Re. Hambleden’s WT [1960].
Views: 2216 marcuscleaver
Rook trusts a plate
 
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Time for some serious protection
Views: 245638 Bite Me